Top stories in gastroenterology: Red wine promotes better gut health, novel therapy effective for acid suppression

Among the top stories in gastroenterology last week were a study that found moderate consumption of red wine helped to promote better diversity in the gut microbiome, and phase 1 study results that demonstrated the potential of a novel therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Other highlights included research that determined peppermint oil reduced symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, a study that found patients who used proton pump inhibitors were at higher risk for developing cholangitis, and a Q&A focusing on the misrepresentation of fecal microbiota transplantation as a treatment for various gastrointestinal disorders and infections.

Red wine promotes better gut health

Moderate consumption of red wine helped to promote better diversity within the gut microbiome, which could contribute to the libation’s many reported health benefits, according to study results. Read more.

Novel therapy shows potential for acid suppression

Tegoprazan, a novel therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease, was well-tolerated and showed rapid, dose-dependent acid suppression, according to results of a phase 1 study. Read more.

Peppermint oil ‘should not be ignored’ for irritable bowel syndrome

Although it did not meet stringent recommended endpoints dictated by the FDA and European Medicines Agency, small intestinal-release peppermint oil reduced abdominal pain, discomfort and severity in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Read more.

Proton pump inhibitors linked with increased cholangitis risk

Patients who used proton pump inhibitors were at higher risk for developing cholangitis, according to study results. Read more.

Q&A: Cleaning up an image: the crusade to rename fecal microbiota transplant

The intrigue surrounding the use of fecal microbiota transplantation to treat various gastrointestinal disorders and infections has intensified over the last several years.

As research continues to ramp up in the area of fecal microbiota transplant, more and more people are becoming interested in the use of fecal microbiota as a remedy for Clostridioides difficile infection as well as inflammatory bowel disease. Read more.

 

Among the top stories in gastroenterology last week were a study that found moderate consumption of red wine helped to promote better diversity in the gut microbiome, and phase 1 study results that demonstrated the potential of a novel therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Other highlights included research that determined peppermint oil reduced symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, a study that found patients who used proton pump inhibitors were at higher risk for developing cholangitis, and a Q&A focusing on the misrepresentation of fecal microbiota transplantation as a treatment for various gastrointestinal disorders and infections.

Red wine promotes better gut health

Moderate consumption of red wine helped to promote better diversity within the gut microbiome, which could contribute to the libation’s many reported health benefits, according to study results. Read more.

Novel therapy shows potential for acid suppression

Tegoprazan, a novel therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease, was well-tolerated and showed rapid, dose-dependent acid suppression, according to results of a phase 1 study. Read more.

Peppermint oil ‘should not be ignored’ for irritable bowel syndrome

Although it did not meet stringent recommended endpoints dictated by the FDA and European Medicines Agency, small intestinal-release peppermint oil reduced abdominal pain, discomfort and severity in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Read more.

Proton pump inhibitors linked with increased cholangitis risk

Patients who used proton pump inhibitors were at higher risk for developing cholangitis, according to study results. Read more.

Q&A: Cleaning up an image: the crusade to rename fecal microbiota transplant

The intrigue surrounding the use of fecal microbiota transplantation to treat various gastrointestinal disorders and infections has intensified over the last several years.

As research continues to ramp up in the area of fecal microbiota transplant, more and more people are becoming interested in the use of fecal microbiota as a remedy for Clostridioides difficile infection as well as inflammatory bowel disease. Read more.