FDA OKs new indication for canagliflozin, laser therapy improves menopausal symptoms — top stories in endocrinology

The FDA recently approved a new indication for the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin, and a randomized controlled trial showed that laser therapy can improve symptoms of menopause.

These and more were among the week’s top stories in endocrinology.

FDA approves canagliflozin to treat diabetic kidney disease, heart failure hospitalization

The FDA approved a new indication for the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin to reduce the risk for end-stage renal disease, worsening of kidney function, cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure among adults with type 2 diabetes and diabetic kidney disease, according to a press release from Janssen. Read more.

Vaginal laser, estrogen treatments similarly improve menopausal symptoms

Laser therapy is as effective and safe as vaginal estrogen for improving sexual and urinary functionality during menopause, according to findings from a randomized controlled trial. Read more.

Linagliptin, glimepiride show similar CV safety in lower-risk type 2 diabetes

Adults with early type 2 diabetes and elevated cardiovascular risk who were assigned the DPP-IV inhibitor linagliptin were no more likely to experience a CV event during 6 years of follow-up than similar adults assigned the sulfonylurea glimepiride, according to study data presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual meeting. Read more.

Gender-affirming hormone therapy alters body composition during adolescence

Transgender adolescents prescribed gender-affirming hormone therapy have substantial differences in body composition when compared with cisgender youths, with body fat and lean mass measurements intermediate between BMI-matched cisgender males and females, according to findings published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Read more.

CV risk lower with metformin vs. sulfonylurea in diabetes with reduced kidney function

A cohort of veterans with type 2 diabetes and reduced kidney function prescribed metformin monotherapy were less likely to experience a major adverse cardiovascular event during 4 years of follow-up when compared with similar adults prescribed sulfonylurea therapy, according to findings published in JAMA. Read more.

The FDA recently approved a new indication for the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin, and a randomized controlled trial showed that laser therapy can improve symptoms of menopause.

These and more were among the week’s top stories in endocrinology.

FDA approves canagliflozin to treat diabetic kidney disease, heart failure hospitalization

The FDA approved a new indication for the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin to reduce the risk for end-stage renal disease, worsening of kidney function, cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure among adults with type 2 diabetes and diabetic kidney disease, according to a press release from Janssen. Read more.

Vaginal laser, estrogen treatments similarly improve menopausal symptoms

Laser therapy is as effective and safe as vaginal estrogen for improving sexual and urinary functionality during menopause, according to findings from a randomized controlled trial. Read more.

Linagliptin, glimepiride show similar CV safety in lower-risk type 2 diabetes

Adults with early type 2 diabetes and elevated cardiovascular risk who were assigned the DPP-IV inhibitor linagliptin were no more likely to experience a CV event during 6 years of follow-up than similar adults assigned the sulfonylurea glimepiride, according to study data presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual meeting. Read more.

Gender-affirming hormone therapy alters body composition during adolescence

Transgender adolescents prescribed gender-affirming hormone therapy have substantial differences in body composition when compared with cisgender youths, with body fat and lean mass measurements intermediate between BMI-matched cisgender males and females, according to findings published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Read more.

CV risk lower with metformin vs. sulfonylurea in diabetes with reduced kidney function

A cohort of veterans with type 2 diabetes and reduced kidney function prescribed metformin monotherapy were less likely to experience a major adverse cardiovascular event during 4 years of follow-up when compared with similar adults prescribed sulfonylurea therapy, according to findings published in JAMA. Read more.