Top stories in endocrinology: Healthy lifestyle can reduce diabetes risk by 75%; breastfeeding, sugar-sweetened beverages may influence childhood obesity risk

Among the top stories in endocrinology last week were findings that suggested adults who practiced a combination of healthy lifestyle factors more than halved their risk for developing type 2 diabetes and a study that determined children exposed to gestational diabetes in utero who were exclusively breastfed were less likely to develop obesity if intake of sugar-sweetened beverages was also low.

Other highlights included the release of a global position statement outlining best practices for estosterone use in women, a study that suggested metabolic syndrome severity may influence the risk for coronary heart disease and diabetes both when it is evaluated in a fasting state and a nonfasting state and research that determined increasing C-peptide levels in type 2 diabetes contributed to a higher likelihood of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease but a lower likelihood of advanced fibrosis.

Healthiest lifestyle can reduce diabetes risk by 75%

Adults who practice a combination of healthy lifestyle factors, such as not smoking, avoiding alcohol, participating in physical activity and maintaining a normal weight, are 75% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes when compared with adults who maintain an unhealthy lifestyle, according to findings published in Diabetologia. Read more.

Breastfeeding, sugar-sweetened beverages influence obesity risk in children exposed to gestational diabetes

A cohort of mostly Hispanic children exposed to gestational diabetes in utero who were exclusively breastfed were 44% less likely to develop obesity when compared with similar children who were not exclusively breastfed, but only when intake of sugar-sweetened beverages was low, according to findings published in Pediatric Obesity. Read more.

Global position statement calls for testosterone formulations for women

A coalition of 11 leading medical societies worldwide released a global position statement outlining best practices for the use of testosterone for women, stating the therapy is appropriate for women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder/dysfunction but noting that evidence does not support such treatment for any other symptoms or medical conditions. Read more.

Fasting not required for metabolic syndrome assessment

Metabolic syndrome severity may influence the risk for coronary heart disease and diabetes both when it is evaluated in a fasting state and a nonfasting state, according to findings published in Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. Read more.

Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis more likely, liver fibrosis less likely with increasing C-peptide levels in type 2 diabetes

Adults with type 2 diabetes and higher C-peptide levels are more likely to develop simple nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis compared with those with lower levels, according to findings published in Diabetes Metabolism Research and Reviews. In contrast, those with higher C-peptide levels are less likely to have advanced fibrosis. Read more.

Among the top stories in endocrinology last week were findings that suggested adults who practiced a combination of healthy lifestyle factors more than halved their risk for developing type 2 diabetes and a study that determined children exposed to gestational diabetes in utero who were exclusively breastfed were less likely to develop obesity if intake of sugar-sweetened beverages was also low.

Other highlights included the release of a global position statement outlining best practices for estosterone use in women, a study that suggested metabolic syndrome severity may influence the risk for coronary heart disease and diabetes both when it is evaluated in a fasting state and a nonfasting state and research that determined increasing C-peptide levels in type 2 diabetes contributed to a higher likelihood of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease but a lower likelihood of advanced fibrosis.

Healthiest lifestyle can reduce diabetes risk by 75%

Adults who practice a combination of healthy lifestyle factors, such as not smoking, avoiding alcohol, participating in physical activity and maintaining a normal weight, are 75% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes when compared with adults who maintain an unhealthy lifestyle, according to findings published in Diabetologia. Read more.

Breastfeeding, sugar-sweetened beverages influence obesity risk in children exposed to gestational diabetes

A cohort of mostly Hispanic children exposed to gestational diabetes in utero who were exclusively breastfed were 44% less likely to develop obesity when compared with similar children who were not exclusively breastfed, but only when intake of sugar-sweetened beverages was low, according to findings published in Pediatric Obesity. Read more.

Global position statement calls for testosterone formulations for women

A coalition of 11 leading medical societies worldwide released a global position statement outlining best practices for the use of testosterone for women, stating the therapy is appropriate for women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder/dysfunction but noting that evidence does not support such treatment for any other symptoms or medical conditions. Read more.

Fasting not required for metabolic syndrome assessment

Metabolic syndrome severity may influence the risk for coronary heart disease and diabetes both when it is evaluated in a fasting state and a nonfasting state, according to findings published in Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. Read more.

Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis more likely, liver fibrosis less likely with increasing C-peptide levels in type 2 diabetes

Adults with type 2 diabetes and higher C-peptide levels are more likely to develop simple nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis compared with those with lower levels, according to findings published in Diabetes Metabolism Research and Reviews. In contrast, those with higher C-peptide levels are less likely to have advanced fibrosis. Read more.