Top stories in cardiology: Aspirin, rivaroxaban similarly effective for recurrent stroke prevention; hypertension increases dementia risk

Among the top stories in cardiology last week were data from the NAVIGATE ESUS trial that suggested aspirin and rivaroxaban were equally effective at preventing recurrent stroke in certain patients and a study that found patients who had sustained hypertension in midlife to late life had an increased risk for dementia later in life.

Other highlights included a study that found modifiable risk factors—such as type 2 diabetes and low levels of physical activity—were more strongly tied to heart failure in women than men, research that suggested the prevalence of myocardial infarction was elevated in areas of high fast food availability and results from the SPRINT MIND trial that indicated intensive BP treatment was beneficial in cerebral small vessel ischemic disease.

Aspirin, rivaroxaban similar for recurrent stroke prevention in certain patients

In patients with embolic stroke of undetermined source and carotid atherosclerosis, aspirin and rivaroxaban were equally effective at preventing recurrent stroke, but aspirin was safer, according to new data from the NAVIGATE ESUS trial. Read more.

Hypertension in midlife, late life increases risk for dementia

Patients who had sustained hypertension in midlife to late life and those with midlife hypertension and late-life hypotension had an increased risk for dementia later in life compared with patients with normal BP in midlife and late life, according to a study published in JAMA. Read more.

Modifiable risk factors more strongly tied to heart failure in women than men

A stronger association exists between incident heart failure and certain modifiable risk factors in women than in men, researchers reported. The modifiable risk factors in question included type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, watching television more than 3 hours per day and low levels of physical activity. Read more.

Myocardial infarction prevalence elevated in areas of high fast food availability

Areas with high density of fast food outlets had greater prevalence of myocardial infarction compared with other areas, according to findings presented at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Read more.

SPRINT MIND: Intensive BP treatment beneficial in cerebral small vessel ischemic disease

Patients with hypertension whose target systolic BP was less than 120 mm Hg had a greater decrease in total brain volume and a smaller increase in cerebral white matter lesion volume compared with those whose target was less than 140 mm Hg, according to results from the SPRINT MIND trial published in JAMA. Read more.

Among the top stories in cardiology last week were data from the NAVIGATE ESUS trial that suggested aspirin and rivaroxaban were equally effective at preventing recurrent stroke in certain patients and a study that found patients who had sustained hypertension in midlife to late life had an increased risk for dementia later in life.

Other highlights included a study that found modifiable risk factors—such as type 2 diabetes and low levels of physical activity—were more strongly tied to heart failure in women than men, research that suggested the prevalence of myocardial infarction was elevated in areas of high fast food availability and results from the SPRINT MIND trial that indicated intensive BP treatment was beneficial in cerebral small vessel ischemic disease.

Aspirin, rivaroxaban similar for recurrent stroke prevention in certain patients

In patients with embolic stroke of undetermined source and carotid atherosclerosis, aspirin and rivaroxaban were equally effective at preventing recurrent stroke, but aspirin was safer, according to new data from the NAVIGATE ESUS trial. Read more.

Hypertension in midlife, late life increases risk for dementia

Patients who had sustained hypertension in midlife to late life and those with midlife hypertension and late-life hypotension had an increased risk for dementia later in life compared with patients with normal BP in midlife and late life, according to a study published in JAMA. Read more.

Modifiable risk factors more strongly tied to heart failure in women than men

A stronger association exists between incident heart failure and certain modifiable risk factors in women than in men, researchers reported. The modifiable risk factors in question included type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, watching television more than 3 hours per day and low levels of physical activity. Read more.

Myocardial infarction prevalence elevated in areas of high fast food availability

Areas with high density of fast food outlets had greater prevalence of myocardial infarction compared with other areas, according to findings presented at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Read more.

SPRINT MIND: Intensive BP treatment beneficial in cerebral small vessel ischemic disease

Patients with hypertension whose target systolic BP was less than 120 mm Hg had a greater decrease in total brain volume and a smaller increase in cerebral white matter lesion volume compared with those whose target was less than 140 mm Hg, according to results from the SPRINT MIND trial published in JAMA. Read more.