Meeting NewsVideo

Pediatricians play key role in preventing, controlling sexually transmitted infections

NEW YORK — Cynthia Holland-Hall MD, MPH, from Nationwide Children’s Hospital, encourages that pediatricians perform routine sexually-transmitted-infection testing, specifically for chlamydia and gonorrhea, for sexually active adolescents.

“One of my missions, professionally, is to help pediatricians understand that testing kids for sexually transmitted infections is something that can absolutely do, even if they feel that it might be outside of their comfort zone,” Holland-Hall told Infectious Diseases in Children.

Multiple tests are available for STI testing, depending on the pediatrician’s comfort level. Testing for chlamydia and gonorrhea can be accomplished with a urine sample, although Holland-Hall noted that a cervical swab would provide a greater level of sensitivity.

“Sexually active women, anyone under the age of 25, should be tested at least once a year for gonorrhea and chlamydia, which can be performed simply with a urine test,” Holland-Hall said. “If you have boys in high-risk situations, it makes sense to test them as well.”

Reference:
Holland-Hall, CM. “Sexually Transmitted Infections Update.” Presented at: IDC NY; Nov. 19-20, 2016; New York.

NEW YORK — Cynthia Holland-Hall MD, MPH, from Nationwide Children’s Hospital, encourages that pediatricians perform routine sexually-transmitted-infection testing, specifically for chlamydia and gonorrhea, for sexually active adolescents.

“One of my missions, professionally, is to help pediatricians understand that testing kids for sexually transmitted infections is something that can absolutely do, even if they feel that it might be outside of their comfort zone,” Holland-Hall told Infectious Diseases in Children.

Multiple tests are available for STI testing, depending on the pediatrician’s comfort level. Testing for chlamydia and gonorrhea can be accomplished with a urine sample, although Holland-Hall noted that a cervical swab would provide a greater level of sensitivity.

“Sexually active women, anyone under the age of 25, should be tested at least once a year for gonorrhea and chlamydia, which can be performed simply with a urine test,” Holland-Hall said. “If you have boys in high-risk situations, it makes sense to test them as well.”

Reference:
Holland-Hall, CM. “Sexually Transmitted Infections Update.” Presented at: IDC NY; Nov. 19-20, 2016; New York.

    See more from IDC New York