California law requires vaccinations for day care workers

California Gov. Jerry Brown recently signed Senate Bill 792, requiring all day care workers and volunteers to be vaccinated against measles, pertussis and influenza.

Tony Mendoza

The legislation requires that all day care workers and volunteers receive pertussis and measles vaccinations, but would allow them to decline the influenza vaccine for reasons related to medical safety and current immunity. The bill does not allow for exemptions based on personal or religious beliefs, similar to California SB 277, which banned these types of exemptions for schoolchildren.

“Children under the age of 5 are one of the most vulnerable age groups for contracting infection and developing complications from these very serious diseases, so it is critical that we use all available methods to protect them,” Mendoza said.

SB 792 goes into effect on Jan. 1.

California Gov. Jerry Brown recently signed Senate Bill 792, requiring all day care workers and volunteers to be vaccinated against measles, pertussis and influenza.

With the deadly outbreaks of measles and influenza this year, we must do everything in our power to protect California’s children who spend time in day care,” Sen. Tony Mendoza, author of SB 792, said in a news release. “If this new law can prevent the loss of even one child due to a communicable disease, then it will be considered a success. Because one child’s death is one too many, especially when it may be preventable.”

Tony Mendoza

The legislation requires that all day care workers and volunteers receive pertussis and measles vaccinations, but would allow them to decline the influenza vaccine for reasons related to medical safety and current immunity. The bill does not allow for exemptions based on personal or religious beliefs, similar to California SB 277, which banned these types of exemptions for schoolchildren.

“Children under the age of 5 are one of the most vulnerable age groups for contracting infection and developing complications from these very serious diseases, so it is critical that we use all available methods to protect them,” Mendoza said.

SB 792 goes into effect on Jan. 1.