Pediatric Annals

Guest Editorial 

Radiology

James S. Donaldson, MD

Abstract

As MRI technology matured and became a routine tool in pediatric imaging, I thought I could relax and enjoy being on the flat part of the learning curve of imaging technology for awhile. Then the old, reliable computed tomography (CT) scanner turned into a multiple-detector sub-second whole-body scanner. Positron emission tomography (PET) became PET/CT and is threatening to become PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). And MRI didn’t level off as I expected. Three Tesla magnets, stronger gradients, and always new imaging sequences continue to bring faster scans with greater resolution and the ability to image moving kids, infants from the NICU, and even fetuses. The imaging technology curve hasn’t flattened out at all, and as pediatric radiologists we find ourselves constantly learning new stuff and struggling with how and when to apply it.

ABOUT THE GUEST EDITOR

James S. Donaldson, MD, is chairman of the Department of Medical Imaging at Children’s Memorial Hospital; Professor of Radiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine; and Fellow of the American College of Radiology. Dr. Donaldson earned his medical degree and completed radiology residency at Loma Linda University Medical Center. He did fellowships in pediatric radiology at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles, and in interventional radiology at the University of California San Diego. In addition to administrative duties, he practices general pediatric radiology and has a primary interest in interventional radiology procedures, particularly in children with vascular anomalies and malformations and those with renovascular hypertension.

Dr. Donaldson is active in many medical societies, including the Society for Pediatric Radiology and the Society for Interventional Radiology, and he is one of the founders of the Society for Pediatric Interventional Radiology. He is a regular board examiner for the American Board of Radiology, has authored and co-authored numerous articles and book chapters, is manuscript reviewer for several journals, and is on the editorial boards of RadioGraphics and Pediatric Radiology.

Abstract

As MRI technology matured and became a routine tool in pediatric imaging, I thought I could relax and enjoy being on the flat part of the learning curve of imaging technology for awhile. Then the old, reliable computed tomography (CT) scanner turned into a multiple-detector sub-second whole-body scanner. Positron emission tomography (PET) became PET/CT and is threatening to become PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). And MRI didn’t level off as I expected. Three Tesla magnets, stronger gradients, and always new imaging sequences continue to bring faster scans with greater resolution and the ability to image moving kids, infants from the NICU, and even fetuses. The imaging technology curve hasn’t flattened out at all, and as pediatric radiologists we find ourselves constantly learning new stuff and struggling with how and when to apply it.

ABOUT THE GUEST EDITOR

James S. Donaldson, MD, is chairman of the Department of Medical Imaging at Children’s Memorial Hospital; Professor of Radiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine; and Fellow of the American College of Radiology. Dr. Donaldson earned his medical degree and completed radiology residency at Loma Linda University Medical Center. He did fellowships in pediatric radiology at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles, and in interventional radiology at the University of California San Diego. In addition to administrative duties, he practices general pediatric radiology and has a primary interest in interventional radiology procedures, particularly in children with vascular anomalies and malformations and those with renovascular hypertension.

Dr. Donaldson is active in many medical societies, including the Society for Pediatric Radiology and the Society for Interventional Radiology, and he is one of the founders of the Society for Pediatric Interventional Radiology. He is a regular board examiner for the American Board of Radiology, has authored and co-authored numerous articles and book chapters, is manuscript reviewer for several journals, and is on the editorial boards of RadioGraphics and Pediatric Radiology.

As MRI technology matured and became a routine tool in pediatric imaging, I thought I could relax and enjoy being on the flat part of the learning curve of imaging technology for awhile. Then the old, reliable computed tomography (CT) scanner turned into a multiple-detector sub-second whole-body scanner. Positron emission tomography (PET) became PET/CT and is threatening to become PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). And MRI didn’t level off as I expected. Three Tesla magnets, stronger gradients, and always new imaging sequences continue to bring faster scans with greater resolution and the ability to image moving kids, infants from the NICU, and even fetuses. The imaging technology curve hasn’t flattened out at all, and as pediatric radiologists we find ourselves constantly learning new stuff and struggling with how and when to apply it.

ABOUT THE GUEST EDITOR

James S. Donaldson, MD, is chairman of the Department of Medical Imaging at Children’s Memorial Hospital; Professor of Radiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine; and Fellow of the American College of Radiology. Dr. Donaldson earned his medical degree and completed radiology residency at Loma Linda University Medical Center. He did fellowships in pediatric radiology at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles, and in interventional radiology at the University of California San Diego. In addition to administrative duties, he practices general pediatric radiology and has a primary interest in interventional radiology procedures, particularly in children with vascular anomalies and malformations and those with renovascular hypertension.

Dr. Donaldson is active in many medical societies, including the Society for Pediatric Radiology and the Society for Interventional Radiology, and he is one of the founders of the Society for Pediatric Interventional Radiology. He is a regular board examiner for the American Board of Radiology, has authored and co-authored numerous articles and book chapters, is manuscript reviewer for several journals, and is on the editorial boards of RadioGraphics and Pediatric Radiology.

10.3928/00904481-20080601-07

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