Pediatric Annals

CME Article 

Beyond the Primary Care Office:Multidisciplinary Approaches to Bright Futures Implementation

Mary Margaret Gottesman, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN; Barbara J. Deloian, PhD, RN, CPNP

Abstract

It is time for the care of children to move beyond preoccupation with preventing disease and preserving life, to knowledgeable care that promotes the physical, psychological, developmental, and social health of children. Health promotion is the new frontier in pediatric healthcare. There is cause to be proud of the effective immunizations that prevent many common diseases of infancy and childhood that killed and disabled thousands of children as recently as 20 or 30 years ago. Research in pediatric surgery, medical management, and critical care also has made significant progress in the care of children with cancer, trauma, and myriad congenital and acquired conditions. In contrast, the development process for the new Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, third edition, has highlighted the tremendous need to focus now on assuring developmental well-being of and health promotion for children. This new edition of the guidelines marks the first application of evidence to child health promotion efforts and the first time that all major organizations setting standards for the healthcare of children have adopted one set of recommendations. These are critical steps forward in reaching the ideals of evidence-based healthcare and integration of information and standards of care.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Mary Margaret Gottesman, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN, is Associate Professor, Clinical Director, Doctor of Nursing Practice Program and PNP Specialty, The Ohio State University College of Nursing; Co-Chair, Bright Futures Pediatric Implementation Project; and Past President, National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Barbara J. Deloian, PhD, RN, CPNP, is Co-Chair, Bright Futures Infancy Expert Panel; Past President, National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, and State Nursing Consultant, Health Care Program for Children with Special Needs (HCP), Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Address correspondence to: Mary Margaret Gottesman, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN, The Ohio State University College of Nursing 1585 Neil Avenue. Columbus, OH 43210; or e-mail gottesman.6@osu.edu.

Dr. Gottesman and Dr. Deloian have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Demonstrate the interdependence of disciplines in the delivery of integrated health­care and health maintenance to children in today’s society.
  2. Describe a new paradigm in health professional education wherein professionals collaborate in their education and thus better understand the skills each brings to the care of the patient.
  3. Determine the steps necessary to build an effective multidisciplinary collaborative community of practice.

Abstract

It is time for the care of children to move beyond preoccupation with preventing disease and preserving life, to knowledgeable care that promotes the physical, psychological, developmental, and social health of children. Health promotion is the new frontier in pediatric healthcare. There is cause to be proud of the effective immunizations that prevent many common diseases of infancy and childhood that killed and disabled thousands of children as recently as 20 or 30 years ago. Research in pediatric surgery, medical management, and critical care also has made significant progress in the care of children with cancer, trauma, and myriad congenital and acquired conditions. In contrast, the development process for the new Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, third edition, has highlighted the tremendous need to focus now on assuring developmental well-being of and health promotion for children. This new edition of the guidelines marks the first application of evidence to child health promotion efforts and the first time that all major organizations setting standards for the healthcare of children have adopted one set of recommendations. These are critical steps forward in reaching the ideals of evidence-based healthcare and integration of information and standards of care.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Mary Margaret Gottesman, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN, is Associate Professor, Clinical Director, Doctor of Nursing Practice Program and PNP Specialty, The Ohio State University College of Nursing; Co-Chair, Bright Futures Pediatric Implementation Project; and Past President, National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Barbara J. Deloian, PhD, RN, CPNP, is Co-Chair, Bright Futures Infancy Expert Panel; Past President, National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, and State Nursing Consultant, Health Care Program for Children with Special Needs (HCP), Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Address correspondence to: Mary Margaret Gottesman, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN, The Ohio State University College of Nursing 1585 Neil Avenue. Columbus, OH 43210; or e-mail gottesman.6@osu.edu.

Dr. Gottesman and Dr. Deloian have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Demonstrate the interdependence of disciplines in the delivery of integrated health­care and health maintenance to children in today’s society.
  2. Describe a new paradigm in health professional education wherein professionals collaborate in their education and thus better understand the skills each brings to the care of the patient.
  3. Determine the steps necessary to build an effective multidisciplinary collaborative community of practice.

It is time for the care of children to move beyond preoccupation with preventing disease and preserving life, to knowledgeable care that promotes the physical, psychological, developmental, and social health of children. Health promotion is the new frontier in pediatric healthcare. There is cause to be proud of the effective immunizations that prevent many common diseases of infancy and childhood that killed and disabled thousands of children as recently as 20 or 30 years ago. Research in pediatric surgery, medical management, and critical care also has made significant progress in the care of children with cancer, trauma, and myriad congenital and acquired conditions. In contrast, the development process for the new Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, third edition, has highlighted the tremendous need to focus now on assuring developmental well-being of and health promotion for children. This new edition of the guidelines marks the first application of evidence to child health promotion efforts and the first time that all major organizations setting standards for the healthcare of children have adopted one set of recommendations. These are critical steps forward in reaching the ideals of evidence-based healthcare and integration of information and standards of care.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Mary Margaret Gottesman, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN, is Associate Professor, Clinical Director, Doctor of Nursing Practice Program and PNP Specialty, The Ohio State University College of Nursing; Co-Chair, Bright Futures Pediatric Implementation Project; and Past President, National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Barbara J. Deloian, PhD, RN, CPNP, is Co-Chair, Bright Futures Infancy Expert Panel; Past President, National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, and State Nursing Consultant, Health Care Program for Children with Special Needs (HCP), Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Address correspondence to: Mary Margaret Gottesman, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN, The Ohio State University College of Nursing 1585 Neil Avenue. Columbus, OH 43210; or e-mail gottesman.6@osu.edu.

Dr. Gottesman and Dr. Deloian have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  1. Demonstrate the interdependence of disciplines in the delivery of integrated health­care and health maintenance to children in today’s society.
  2. Describe a new paradigm in health professional education wherein professionals collaborate in their education and thus better understand the skills each brings to the care of the patient.
  3. Determine the steps necessary to build an effective multidisciplinary collaborative community of practice.

10.3928/00904481-20080401-08

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