Pediatric Annals

Editorial 

Sports Safety: Nutrition, Psychology, Overuse, Contact, Strength, and Non-Contact

Stanford T. Shulman, MD

Abstract

Dr. Jordan Metzl is the guest editor for this Sports Medicine issue of Pediatric Annals. All pediatric practitioners have patients who are active in sports at various levels, and the topics covered in this issue are relevant to your practice. As a former sports editor and lifelong sports fan, I was unaware of the potential role for the sports psychologist in dealing with adolescent athletes and their issues. Similarly, I have apparently been oblivious to the role of optimal nutrition for the young athlete. Important information is also included in the articles on non-contact sports, contact sports, overuse injury, and strength training, each from the perspective of dealing with the child or adolescent athlete.

Abstract

Dr. Jordan Metzl is the guest editor for this Sports Medicine issue of Pediatric Annals. All pediatric practitioners have patients who are active in sports at various levels, and the topics covered in this issue are relevant to your practice. As a former sports editor and lifelong sports fan, I was unaware of the potential role for the sports psychologist in dealing with adolescent athletes and their issues. Similarly, I have apparently been oblivious to the role of optimal nutrition for the young athlete. Important information is also included in the articles on non-contact sports, contact sports, overuse injury, and strength training, each from the perspective of dealing with the child or adolescent athlete.

Dr. Jordan Metzl is the guest editor for this Sports Medicine issue of Pediatric Annals. All pediatric practitioners have patients who are active in sports at various levels, and the topics covered in this issue are relevant to your practice. As a former sports editor and lifelong sports fan, I was unaware of the potential role for the sports psychologist in dealing with adolescent athletes and their issues. Similarly, I have apparently been oblivious to the role of optimal nutrition for the young athlete. Important information is also included in the articles on non-contact sports, contact sports, overuse injury, and strength training, each from the perspective of dealing with the child or adolescent athlete.

The beautiful French art stamp issued in 1970 (see page 260) is titled “Ballerina Curtseying with a Bouquet in her Hand,” by Edgar Degas. (The artist’s actual family name was de Gas or De Gas). I’ve chosen it to illustrate one kind of physical activity that adolescents may be involved in that can lead to physical and psychologic issues. Both the article on non-contact sports (including dance) by Amanda Weiss Kelly (see page 279) and the Nutrition article by Leslie Bonci (see page 300) provide illustrative cases that involve a teen ballet dancer’s issues.

Additionally, the 2008 souvenir sheet from the Comoros Islands in the Indian Ocean appears to honor six of the most famous physicians (“les Medecins”) in history. Actually, two of the six were not physicians. These include one non-physician, Humphry Davy (1778–1829), who is renowned for his major chemistry discoveries, becoming president of the Royal Society. He discovered sodium chlorine, potassium, calcium, magnesium, boron, and barium, among other landmark early chemistry accomplishments. Also shown are Robert Koch (1843–1910), who discovered the anthrax and tuberculosis bacilli; Emil Adolph von Behring (1854–1917), who discovered diphtheria and tetanus antitoxin; another non-physician, Louis Pasteur (1822–1895), who proved the germ theory (among his very many achievements); Frederick Banting (1891–1941), co-discoverer of insulin; and Alexander Fleming (1881–1955), who discovered penicillin.

This Stamp Honors Six of the Most Famous Physicians in History. Stamp from the Collection of Dr. Shulman.

This Stamp Honors Six of the Most Famous Physicians in History. Stamp from the Collection of Dr. Shulman.

This Stamp of a Degas Painting Illustrates One Kind of Physical Activity that Adolescents May Be Involved in that Can Lead to Physical and Psychologic Issues.

This Stamp of a Degas Painting Illustrates One Kind of Physical Activity that Adolescents May Be Involved in that Can Lead to Physical and Psychologic Issues.

10.3928/00904481-20100422-01

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