Pediatric Annals

Guest Editorial 

This Issue: Sports Medicine in the Pediatric Office

Jordan D. Metzl, MD, FAAP, CAQSM

Abstract

Welcome to our May issue of Pediatric Annals, Sports Medicine in the Pediatric Office: Update 2010. This edition is designed to update the pediatric community on the important topics and updates in the field of sports medicine. For those who care for athletic children and teens on a regular basis, the ever changing issues of sport participation, injury prevention, and sport safety are a constant source of interface between parents, coaches, athletes, and the healthcare system. We hope to provide you with information that will help you address these important issues with the families and athletes under your care. In this edition, we have attempted to bring a case-based, user-friendly format to the help teach and explain these points.

Abstract

Welcome to our May issue of Pediatric Annals, Sports Medicine in the Pediatric Office: Update 2010. This edition is designed to update the pediatric community on the important topics and updates in the field of sports medicine. For those who care for athletic children and teens on a regular basis, the ever changing issues of sport participation, injury prevention, and sport safety are a constant source of interface between parents, coaches, athletes, and the healthcare system. We hope to provide you with information that will help you address these important issues with the families and athletes under your care. In this edition, we have attempted to bring a case-based, user-friendly format to the help teach and explain these points.

Welcome to our May issue of Pediatric Annals, Sports Medicine in the Pediatric Office: Update 2010. This edition is designed to update the pediatric community on the important topics and updates in the field of sports medicine. For those who care for athletic children and teens on a regular basis, the ever changing issues of sport participation, injury prevention, and sport safety are a constant source of interface between parents, coaches, athletes, and the healthcare system. We hope to provide you with information that will help you address these important issues with the families and athletes under your care. In this edition, we have attempted to bring a case-based, user-friendly format to the help teach and explain these points.

As those who have been practicing pediatric health for quite some time can appreciate, the issues of sports medicine in the pediatric office setting have become increasingly important to the pediatrician. Whereas athletic children and adolescents, and their families, were once likely to simply rest from sports injuries, the active young athlete of today, and his or her family, is often much more involved with health issues. Because of a combination of advances in the field of sports medicine research and more readily available health information through advances in internet-based health sites, today’s young people often come to the office looking for help with a specific sports-related issue. The result is that pediatric health professionals are often a focal point of information for athletic children and their families.

Are pediatric health professionals doing a good job with this task? Are they keeping up with the demands of their athletic patients?

Fortunately, in many cases, they are. Over the past 15 years, pediatric sports medicine has continued to evolve as a fast-growing specialty within the fields of sports medicine, orthopedics, and pediatrics. Often, there is overlap among these specialty areas. In many areas of the country, pediatric sports medicine specialists with initial training in pediatrics and specialty training in sports medicine are at the forefront of this movement.

This issue of Pediatric Annals, Sports Medicine in the Pediatric Office continues the trend toward educating pediatric health professionals on the issues of sports medicine for young athletes. The authors of this issue represent many leaders in the field of pediatric sports medicine nationwide, and I am extremely grateful for their assistance in making this issue possible.

We hope that you find it useful as you care for your athletic patients.

Jordan D. Metzl, MD, FAAP, CAQSM, is a sports medicine physician, member of the Sports Medicine Service at Hospital for Special Surgery, and an Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at Cornell Medical College in New York. Dr. Metzl is also the co-founder of the Sports Medicine Institute for Young Athletes program at the Hospital for Special Surgery.

Dr. Metzl has authored multiple articles and book chapters on pediatric sports medicine, and lectures and teaches extensively on this subject, both nationally and internationally. Dr. Metzl has authored two books, The Young Athlete: A Sports Doctor’s Complete Guide for Parents (Little Brown, 2002) and most recently, Sports Medicine in the Pediatric Office: A Multimedia Case-Based Text with Video (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2007).

Dr. Metzl has been committed to educating pediatric health professionals on sports medicine since his residency in pediatrics at New England Medical Center. He completed sports medicine fellowships at Vanderbilt University and Boston Children’s Hospital. He is the founder of the Sports Medicine for the Young Athlete, an annual educational conference that teaches sports medicine to those who care for athletic children and teens, including pediatricians, athletic trainers, physical therapists, and school nurses. The conference is held annually at Hospital for Special Surgery and is in its 12th year.

In addition to his medical practice and teaching responsibilities, Dr. Metzl is a devoted athlete himself, a 28-time marathon runner and seven-time Ironman triathlete. He currently writes the medical column in Triathlete magazine.

This marks his fourth guest editorship for Pediatric Annals on the subject of sports medicine in pediatric practice, the last of which was published in November 2007.

10.3928/00904481-20100422-04

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