Pediatric Annals

Editorial 

Skin Emergencies

Stanford T. Shulman, MD

Abstract

This issue of Pediatric Annals reminds me of the Seinfeld episode in which Jerry makes fun of his dermatologist date as a “zit doctor,” but then a skin cancer survivor interrupts the date to express his thanks to the dermatologist for saving his life. This issue is a reminder that pediatric dermatology and other skin-related issues also include a number of serious disorders.

Abstract

This issue of Pediatric Annals reminds me of the Seinfeld episode in which Jerry makes fun of his dermatologist date as a “zit doctor,” but then a skin cancer survivor interrupts the date to express his thanks to the dermatologist for saving his life. This issue is a reminder that pediatric dermatology and other skin-related issues also include a number of serious disorders.

This issue of Pediatric Annals reminds me of the Seinfeld episode in which Jerry makes fun of his dermatologist date as a “zit doctor,” but then a skin cancer survivor interrupts the date to express his thanks to the dermatologist for saving his life. This issue is a reminder that pediatric dermatology and other skin-related issues also include a number of serious disorders.

The reviews included here (assembled by Guest Editor Mary Wu Chang from University of Connecticut) are comprehensive. They include Cutaneous Drug Reactions in Children; MRSA, Staph Scalded Skin Syndrome, and other Cutaneous Emergencies; Blisters and Pustules in the Newborn; Bruising in Infancy; Eczema Herpeticum and Eczema Vaccination in Children; and Stevens-Johnson and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

I’ve previously noted here that there are only a precious few stamps ever issued on a topic related to dermatology. One such is the 1973 Liberian souvenir sheet containing the small portrait of Paul Ehrlich (1854–1915; see page 598). Ehrlich received the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1908 in part for his discovery of Salvarsan (compound 606), an organic arsenical that he specifically developed to treat syphilis. This was actually one of the first chemotherapeutic agents to target a specific infection.

The white 1982 Canadian stamp (see page 598) portrays in an abstract form a running man who has a prosthetic right leg (you have to look carefully). Terry Fox’s leg was amputated for osteosarcoma when he was 18 years, and when he was 21 years, he initiated a trans-Canada run called the Marathon of Hope to raise funds for cancer research. After his death from metastatic disease, the annual Terry Fox Run has continued throughout many locales in Canada and elsewhere to raise funds, actually becoming the world’s largest one-day fundraiser for cancer.

The Stamp from Malaysia Showing a Right Eye Was Issued to Emphasize Treatment of Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency.

The Stamp from Malaysia Showing a Right Eye Was Issued to Emphasize Treatment of Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency.

The 1973 Liberian Souvenir Sheet Containing the Small Portrait of Paul Ehrlich, Who Received the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1908.

The 1973 Liberian Souvenir Sheet Containing the Small Portrait of Paul Ehrlich, Who Received the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1908.

The stamp from Malaysia (see page 597) showing a right eye was issued to emphasize treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency. This condition can be the result of very severe Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) or its more severe counterpart, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), among other etiologies. Damage to the stem cells at the limbus (periphery of the cornea) can result, leading to severe visual activity loss/blindness. Transplantation of cultivated limbal epithelial cells is a new therapy developed in part by Malaysian researchers (hence, the Malaysian stamp) that has been associated with some success in restoring more a normal corneal epithelial layer and restoring lost vision.

The White 1982 Canadian Stamp Portrays in an Abstract Form a Running Man Who Has a Prosthetic Right Leg.

The White 1982 Canadian Stamp Portrays in an Abstract Form a Running Man Who Has a Prosthetic Right Leg.

10.3928/00904481-20100922-06

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