Pediatric Annals

CME QUIZ

Abstract

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Review the stated learning objectives of the CME anides and determine if these objectives match your individual learning needs.

2. Read the articles carefully. Do not neglect the tables and other illustrative materials, as they have been selected to enhance your knowledge and understanding.

3. The following quiz questions have been designed to provide a useful link between the CME articles in the issue and your everyday practice. Read each question, choose the correct answer, and record your answer on the CME REGISTRATION FORM at the end of the quiz. Retain a copy of your answers so that they can be compared with the correct answers should you choose to request them.

4. Type or print your full name and address and your date of birth in the space provided on the CME REGISTRATION FORM.

5. Complete the evaluation portion of the CME REGISTRATION FORM. Forms and quizzes cannot be processed if the evaluation portion is incomplete. The evaluation portion of the CME REGISTRATION FORM will be separated from the quiz upon receipt at PEDIATRIC ANNALS. Your evaluation of this activity will in no way affect the scoring of your quiz.

6. Send the completed form, with your $25 payment (check, money order, or credit card information) to: VINDICO MEDICAL EDUCATION, PO Box 36,Thorofare NJ 08086. Payment should be made in US dollars drawn on a US bank.

7. Your answers will be graded, and you will be advised whether you have passed or failed. Unanswered questions will be considered incorrect. A score of at least 80% is required to pass.Upon receiving your grade, you may request quiz answers. Contact our customer service department at (856)994-9400.

8. Be sure to mail the CME REGISTRATION FORM on or before the deadline listed. After that date, the quiz will close. Any CME REGISTRATION FORM received after the date listed will not be processed.

CME ACCREDITATION

This CME activity is primarily targeted to pediatricians, osteopathic physicians, pediatric nurse practitioners, and others allied to the field. There are no specific background req uirements for participants taking this activity. Learning objectives are found at the beginning of each CME article.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of Vindico Medical Education and PEDIATRIC ANNALS. Vindico Medical Education is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Vindico Medical Education designates this educational activity for a maximum of 3 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

FULL DISCLOSURE POLICY

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education's Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity authence the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue.

UNLABELED AND INVESTIGATIONAL USAGE

The authence is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of FDA-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage.

Questions 1 through 5 are taken from the…

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Review the stated learning objectives of the CME anides and determine if these objectives match your individual learning needs.

2. Read the articles carefully. Do not neglect the tables and other illustrative materials, as they have been selected to enhance your knowledge and understanding.

3. The following quiz questions have been designed to provide a useful link between the CME articles in the issue and your everyday practice. Read each question, choose the correct answer, and record your answer on the CME REGISTRATION FORM at the end of the quiz. Retain a copy of your answers so that they can be compared with the correct answers should you choose to request them.

4. Type or print your full name and address and your date of birth in the space provided on the CME REGISTRATION FORM.

5. Complete the evaluation portion of the CME REGISTRATION FORM. Forms and quizzes cannot be processed if the evaluation portion is incomplete. The evaluation portion of the CME REGISTRATION FORM will be separated from the quiz upon receipt at PEDIATRIC ANNALS. Your evaluation of this activity will in no way affect the scoring of your quiz.

6. Send the completed form, with your $25 payment (check, money order, or credit card information) to: VINDICO MEDICAL EDUCATION, PO Box 36,Thorofare NJ 08086. Payment should be made in US dollars drawn on a US bank.

7. Your answers will be graded, and you will be advised whether you have passed or failed. Unanswered questions will be considered incorrect. A score of at least 80% is required to pass.Upon receiving your grade, you may request quiz answers. Contact our customer service department at (856)994-9400.

8. Be sure to mail the CME REGISTRATION FORM on or before the deadline listed. After that date, the quiz will close. Any CME REGISTRATION FORM received after the date listed will not be processed.

CME ACCREDITATION

This CME activity is primarily targeted to pediatricians, osteopathic physicians, pediatric nurse practitioners, and others allied to the field. There are no specific background req uirements for participants taking this activity. Learning objectives are found at the beginning of each CME article.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of Vindico Medical Education and PEDIATRIC ANNALS. Vindico Medical Education is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Vindico Medical Education designates this educational activity for a maximum of 3 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

FULL DISCLOSURE POLICY

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education's Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity authence the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue.

UNLABELED AND INVESTIGATIONAL USAGE

The authence is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of FDA-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage.

Questions 1 through 5 are taken from the article "Early Intervention: A Crash Course for Pediatricians" by Lisa H. Shulman, MD; Deborah Meringolo, MA, MS; and Gretel Scott, LMSW (pages 463-469).

1 . Part C legislation of the Early Intervention Program requires that each state:

A. Implement clearly defined eligibility criteria.

B. Develop a statewide multidisciplinary system that provides early intervention services for infants and

C. Create a system of follow-up for at- risk infants and toddlers.

D. All of the above.

2. All of the following areas are assessed during an early intervention multidisciplinary evaluation except:

A. Cognitive.

B. Parent-child interaction.

C. Adaptive.

D. Communication.

3. Which of the following is no longer viewed by pediatricians as a major obstacle in their ability to use standardized instruments during developmental screening?

A. Not enough time.

B. Not enough staff.

C. Lack of training.

D. Inadequate reimbursement.

4. The purpose of developmental screening in the office is to:

A. Determine if the child is eligible for early intervention services.

B. Identify children at risk for a developmental delay.

C. Provide a diagnosis.

D. Prevent the need for a multidisciplinary evaluation.

5. An American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) survey found that few pediatricians had implemented an effective means for screening their patients for developmental problems and that continued reliance on clinical assessments and non-standardized methods was seen in:

A. Less than 20% of practices.

B. About 50% of practices.

C. More than 70% of practices.

D. None of the above.

Questions 6 through 10 are taken from the article "Therapeutic Approaches to Speech and Language Disorders in Early Childhood" by Nancy Tarshis, MA, MS, CCC-SLP; Brenda C. Rodriguez, MS, CCC-SLP; and Rosa M. Seijo, MD (pages 470-477).

6. All of the following characteristics are associated with childhood apraxia of speech except:

A. Difficulty producing multisyllabic words.

B. Cluttering.

C. Atypical sound development.

D. Problems producing vowels.

7. Techniques utilized by speech-language pathologists to address developmental language disorders include:

A. Imitation.

B. Parallel talk.

C. Expansion.

D. All of the above.

8. Which of the following statements is false?

A. Speech problems that are structurally based should be treated in collaboration with medical and dental professionals.

B. Treatment for phonological disorders can consist of cognitive-linguistic approaches.

C. Children with severe phonological disorders are not at any increased risk for reading problems.

D. Oral motor therapy can be sued for feeding problems and drooling.

9. Which of the following therapeutic methods is the fastest and most reliable means to secure the attention of the child with even the most profound delays?

A. Imitation.

B. Expansion.

C. Parallel talk.

D. Self talk.

10. Stuttering typically appears between the ages of:

A. 2 to 6 years.

B. 18 to 24 months.

C. 6 to 8 years.

D. None of the above.

Questions 11 through 15 are taken from the article "Feeding Disorders in Children: Taking an Interdisciplinary Approach" by Keith-Thomas Ayoob, EdD, RD, FADA; and Ida Barresi, MA, CCC-SP. (pages 478-483).

11. Important factors that warrant referral for a feeding evaluation include:

A. Failure to meet normal feeding milestones.

B. Swallowing dysfunction.

C. Children fed by nasogastric or gastrostomy tube.

D. All of the above.

12. A clinical assessment of aspiration in a child is accurate only:

A. 20% to 25% of the time.

B. 40% of the time.

C. 50% to 60% of the time.

D. 90% of the time.

13. An assessment of feeding skills should include all of the following except:

A. Fluoroscopic analysis of swallowing.

B. Observation of feeding skills of the child.

C. Dietary pattern and feeding schedule.

D. Assessment of oral hyper- or hyposensitivity.

14. A child who demonstrates tongue and jaw movement as one unit, suckling in anticipation of a spoon, and poor coordination of suck, swallow, and breathing is most likely:

A. 0 to 3 months.

B. 4 to 6 months.

C. 7 to 9 months.

D. 10 to 12 months.

1 5. Fruits such as soft canned bite-sized fruits and ripe banana are best introduced at:

A. 4 to 6 months.

B. 9 to 10 months.

C. 10 to 12 months.

D. 14 to 16 months.

Questions 16 through 20 are taken from the article "Occupational and Physical Therapy Approaches to Sensory and Motor Issues" by Lillian Kornhaber, PT, MPH; Elizabeth Ridgway, OTR; and Rani Kathirithamby, MD (pages 484493).

16. A 6-month-old child who presents with which of the following behaviors should be referred for occupational and physical therapy evaluations?

A. Poor visual regard for hands.

B. Excessive arching of back in prone and supine positions.

C. Only sits with rounded back.

D. All of the above.

17. Motor compensations frequently seen in children with developmental delay include: A. Neck hyperextension.

B. Shoulder elevation.

C. Stiffening of the spinal extensors to support the body in- stead of controlling the activation of flexor and extensor muscles.

D. All of the above.

1 8. All of the following are indications for referral to a physi- cal therapist for evaluation except: A. Gait dysfunction.

B. Deficits in sensory processing.

C. Limitations in range of motion.

D. Problems related to cardiopulmonary or respiratory function.

19. Red flags of possible developmental delay include all of the following except: A. Excess stiffness or floppiness at 2 months.

B. Poor visual tracking in the supine position at 4 months.

C. Rounded posture in sitting at 2 months.

D. Bottom scooting at 1 2 months.

20. Delays that may occur in a child's life as the child is ex- pected to perform more complex tasks include: A. Problems in attention.

B. Difficulties with relatedness.

C. Compromised cognition.

10.3928/0090-4481-20070801-11

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents