Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

This CME activity is primarily targeted to patient-caring physicians specializing in pediatrics. Physicians can receive AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ by reading the CME articles in Pediatric Annals and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the articles. Complete instructions are given subsequently. Educational objectives are found at the beginning of each CME article.

CME ACCREDITATION

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of Vindico Medical Education and Pediatric Annals. Vindico Medical Education is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Vindico Medical Education designates this educational activity for a maximum of 3 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

FULL DISCLOSURE POLICY

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education's Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity authence the retevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 1 2 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue

UNLABELED AND INVESTIGATIONAL USAGE

The authence is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of FDA-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Perhaps in no other field of medicine does prevention play a larger role than in the daily practice of pediatrics. From periodic well visits and anticipatory guidance to education provided at each acute care visit, prevention is emphasized at every turn to assure the patient's good health. Immunizations play a large part in this preventive effort, with any visit considered an opportunity to immunize. Advances in immunization technology and better understanding of disease dynamics produce new recommendations each year that must be integrated into daily workflow quickly to be effective.

With our increasingly cosmopolitan population, pediatricians must stay abreast of the best methods to prevent disease in children whose parents choose to travel abroad. With Internet access ever present, it is no longer difficult to access information on exotic diseases or locales to best prepare families for travel. Indeed, after the terrorist attacks of September 1 1, 2001, all physicians must stay informed of the latest information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on suspected bioterrorism agents. Children, given their unique physiology, would serve as "canaries in the coal mine" in the event of an intentional release, and antimicrobials would have to be deployed quickly and in novel ways.

This edition of Pediatric Annals is the first of a two-part series on challenging topics in infectious disease important to the pediatrician's daily practice. After reviewing this volume, the participant will have a better understanding of the science behind the latest vaccine recommendations for adolescents, the reasoning underlying the recommended use of fluoroquinolones in children, as well as the role he or she can play in the prevention of exotic diseases in travelers and the detection of a potential bioterrorism attack.

PRETEST

1. Teenagers with laboratory documented pertussis infection during infancy or young childhood need…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

This CME activity is primarily targeted to patient-caring physicians specializing in pediatrics. Physicians can receive AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ by reading the CME articles in Pediatric Annals and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the articles. Complete instructions are given subsequently. Educational objectives are found at the beginning of each CME article.

CME ACCREDITATION

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of Vindico Medical Education and Pediatric Annals. Vindico Medical Education is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Vindico Medical Education designates this educational activity for a maximum of 3 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

FULL DISCLOSURE POLICY

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education's Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity authence the retevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 1 2 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue

UNLABELED AND INVESTIGATIONAL USAGE

The authence is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of FDA-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Perhaps in no other field of medicine does prevention play a larger role than in the daily practice of pediatrics. From periodic well visits and anticipatory guidance to education provided at each acute care visit, prevention is emphasized at every turn to assure the patient's good health. Immunizations play a large part in this preventive effort, with any visit considered an opportunity to immunize. Advances in immunization technology and better understanding of disease dynamics produce new recommendations each year that must be integrated into daily workflow quickly to be effective.

With our increasingly cosmopolitan population, pediatricians must stay abreast of the best methods to prevent disease in children whose parents choose to travel abroad. With Internet access ever present, it is no longer difficult to access information on exotic diseases or locales to best prepare families for travel. Indeed, after the terrorist attacks of September 1 1, 2001, all physicians must stay informed of the latest information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on suspected bioterrorism agents. Children, given their unique physiology, would serve as "canaries in the coal mine" in the event of an intentional release, and antimicrobials would have to be deployed quickly and in novel ways.

This edition of Pediatric Annals is the first of a two-part series on challenging topics in infectious disease important to the pediatrician's daily practice. After reviewing this volume, the participant will have a better understanding of the science behind the latest vaccine recommendations for adolescents, the reasoning underlying the recommended use of fluoroquinolones in children, as well as the role he or she can play in the prevention of exotic diseases in travelers and the detection of a potential bioterrorism attack.

PRETEST

1. Teenagers with laboratory documented pertussis infection during infancy or young childhood need not be immunized with pertussis-containing vaccine at their adolescent well visit.

A. True.

B. False.

2. The most important potential toxicity that has limited the use of fluoroquinolones in children is damage to the developing musculoskeletal system.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Malaria vaccination should be recommended for travelers to malaria endemic areas.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Authorized stocks of smallpox virus exist only in labs in the United States and Russia.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1. B

2. A

3. B

4. A

10.3928/0090-4481-20070601-06

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