Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Alicia F Lieberman, PhD; Kathleen Knorr, LICSW

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education's Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Stress. It is al) around us. In our modern, drive-through society, stress is an expectation of daily life. Its abrupt absence can often leave us with a sense that something is missing or wrong. From natural disasters to acts of terrorism, children today are exposed to a wide panorama of stress, either directly as victims or indirectly through our intrusive and everpresent media. Indeed, many of the behavioral issues we encounter in our patients can be attributed to the stress they are experiencing from day to day.

Pediatric residency training does little to prepare the practitioner for managing distressed families and children, much less their own stress. The typical office setting during the busy winter months can often best be described as "managed chaos." Yet it is in this very setting that the practitioner must be aware of the Stressors facing every family and therefore manifesting as dysfunctional behavior and development in the child. With our knowledge of the dynamics of each family and the resources in our local communities, the practicing pediatrician is uniquely placed to detect and intervene when stress begins to produce dysfunctional maladaptive behaviors in children and parents.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides six excellent reviews of the subject of stress in children. After reading these articles the participant will be much better prepared to serve as an advocate and resource for distressed families and their children.

PRETEST

1 . Children with medically unexplained symptoms generally do not experience decreased school performance and school absence.

A.True.

B. False.

2. Th e Unites States ranks third among 27 industrialized nations in the number of childhood deaths due to maltreatment.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Paternal depression affects children more than maternal depression.

A.True.

B. False.

4. Rapid recovery from the effects of brief, everyday stresses can promote new coping skills and enhance a sense of competency.

A. True.

B. False.

5. The typical reaction of a child to a severe stress such as a disaster or crisis is to blame their parents.

A.True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.B 2. A 3. B 4. A 5. B…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education's Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Stress. It is al) around us. In our modern, drive-through society, stress is an expectation of daily life. Its abrupt absence can often leave us with a sense that something is missing or wrong. From natural disasters to acts of terrorism, children today are exposed to a wide panorama of stress, either directly as victims or indirectly through our intrusive and everpresent media. Indeed, many of the behavioral issues we encounter in our patients can be attributed to the stress they are experiencing from day to day.

Pediatric residency training does little to prepare the practitioner for managing distressed families and children, much less their own stress. The typical office setting during the busy winter months can often best be described as "managed chaos." Yet it is in this very setting that the practitioner must be aware of the Stressors facing every family and therefore manifesting as dysfunctional behavior and development in the child. With our knowledge of the dynamics of each family and the resources in our local communities, the practicing pediatrician is uniquely placed to detect and intervene when stress begins to produce dysfunctional maladaptive behaviors in children and parents.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides six excellent reviews of the subject of stress in children. After reading these articles the participant will be much better prepared to serve as an advocate and resource for distressed families and their children.

PRETEST

1 . Children with medically unexplained symptoms generally do not experience decreased school performance and school absence.

A.True.

B. False.

2. Th e Unites States ranks third among 27 industrialized nations in the number of childhood deaths due to maltreatment.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Paternal depression affects children more than maternal depression.

A.True.

B. False.

4. Rapid recovery from the effects of brief, everyday stresses can promote new coping skills and enhance a sense of competency.

A. True.

B. False.

5. The typical reaction of a child to a severe stress such as a disaster or crisis is to blame their parents.

A.True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.B 2. A 3. B 4. A 5. B

10.3928/0090-4481-20070401-06

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