Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be cove red and will make it possi ble for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education's Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

With the explosion of childhood obesity worldwide, this generation is poised to be the first to live a shorter lifespan than the last Child healthcare professionals are uniquely positioned to make a significant and sustained impact on this epidemic through effective anticipatory guidance delivered at routine well-child visits. Indeed, the necessity and value of the scheduled well visit in children has been questioned in recent years, yet detecting and managing the overweight or at risk for overweight child fits perfectly with this care delivery paradigm.

Once the realm of the internist or family practitioner, type 2 diabetes is now an entity with which the pediatrician will have to become facile. Detection of early insulin resistance, management of diet, and effective use of pharmaceutical agents are all becoming part of daily life in the pediatrie office. Of more importance, however, is effective prevention of overweight in children. Here is where more research is needed to find the appropriate blend of dietary management, activity change, and psychological counseling that delivers consistent success.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides four excellent reviews on childhood overweight, its current epidemiology, anticipated complications, and effective management schemes. In the final analysis it is the pediatrician's impact on his or her community and society as a whole that will curb the current epidemic. After reviewing this issue, the participant will be much better prepared to serve in that role.

PRETEST

1 . Fatty liver affects less than 1 5% of obese children.

A. True.

B. False.

2. About 30% to 50% of obese adolescents report symptoms consistent with depression.

A. True.

B. False.

3. About 25% of adolescent girls with polycystic ovarian syndrome have type 2 diabetes.

A. True.

B. False.

4. A glycosylated hemoglobin is a standard part of the evaluation of type 2 diabetes in children.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1. B 2. A 3. B 4. B…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be cove red and will make it possi ble for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education's Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

With the explosion of childhood obesity worldwide, this generation is poised to be the first to live a shorter lifespan than the last Child healthcare professionals are uniquely positioned to make a significant and sustained impact on this epidemic through effective anticipatory guidance delivered at routine well-child visits. Indeed, the necessity and value of the scheduled well visit in children has been questioned in recent years, yet detecting and managing the overweight or at risk for overweight child fits perfectly with this care delivery paradigm.

Once the realm of the internist or family practitioner, type 2 diabetes is now an entity with which the pediatrician will have to become facile. Detection of early insulin resistance, management of diet, and effective use of pharmaceutical agents are all becoming part of daily life in the pediatrie office. Of more importance, however, is effective prevention of overweight in children. Here is where more research is needed to find the appropriate blend of dietary management, activity change, and psychological counseling that delivers consistent success.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides four excellent reviews on childhood overweight, its current epidemiology, anticipated complications, and effective management schemes. In the final analysis it is the pediatrician's impact on his or her community and society as a whole that will curb the current epidemic. After reviewing this issue, the participant will be much better prepared to serve in that role.

PRETEST

1 . Fatty liver affects less than 1 5% of obese children.

A. True.

B. False.

2. About 30% to 50% of obese adolescents report symptoms consistent with depression.

A. True.

B. False.

3. About 25% of adolescent girls with polycystic ovarian syndrome have type 2 diabetes.

A. True.

B. False.

4. A glycosylated hemoglobin is a standard part of the evaluation of type 2 diabetes in children.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1. B 2. A 3. B 4. B

10.3928/0090-4481-20070201-06

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