Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education's Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Mankind's lifespan has increased dramatically during the past century, in part due to the widespread use of childhood immunizations. At the turn of the last century, it was highly uncertain whether one would grow to adulthood with a sibling, so prevalent were devastating childhood illnesses. With the advent of vaccination programs, these illnesses are all but a memory for many people. It is clear that these early gains were due to carefully organized, widespread public health campaigns led by government agencies.

In the United States today, the primary care provider's office is the medical home for the patient. As a consequence, this is now the location where battles against communicable childhood diseases are fought. Each provider now balances pressure from insurers to keep immunization rates high, regardless of socioeconomic strata of the patients and ability to keep appointments, and the ever-shifting landscape of coding and reimbursement for vaccine delivery. Each office must now broaden its focus to include not only the health and well-being of its patients but also that of the entire community at large. Only through the use of organized immunization tracking mechanisms can these goals be met.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides excellent reviews relevant to these challenges. Each article provides strategies to help the office provider become more successful in effectively and economically providing immunizations to their clientele while serving the public at large by participating in immunization registries and vaccine coalitions.

PRETEST

1. Elementary school requirements alone are not adequate to achieve national immunization goals.

A. True.

B. False.

2. Immunization registries are a public health tool and not useful in the primary care practice setting.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Most primary care providers do not know the overall immunization status of patients in their practices.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Children with delayed immunizations who fail to return for their vaccines should receive case management.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.A 2.B 3.A 4.A…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education's Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Mankind's lifespan has increased dramatically during the past century, in part due to the widespread use of childhood immunizations. At the turn of the last century, it was highly uncertain whether one would grow to adulthood with a sibling, so prevalent were devastating childhood illnesses. With the advent of vaccination programs, these illnesses are all but a memory for many people. It is clear that these early gains were due to carefully organized, widespread public health campaigns led by government agencies.

In the United States today, the primary care provider's office is the medical home for the patient. As a consequence, this is now the location where battles against communicable childhood diseases are fought. Each provider now balances pressure from insurers to keep immunization rates high, regardless of socioeconomic strata of the patients and ability to keep appointments, and the ever-shifting landscape of coding and reimbursement for vaccine delivery. Each office must now broaden its focus to include not only the health and well-being of its patients but also that of the entire community at large. Only through the use of organized immunization tracking mechanisms can these goals be met.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides excellent reviews relevant to these challenges. Each article provides strategies to help the office provider become more successful in effectively and economically providing immunizations to their clientele while serving the public at large by participating in immunization registries and vaccine coalitions.

PRETEST

1. Elementary school requirements alone are not adequate to achieve national immunization goals.

A. True.

B. False.

2. Immunization registries are a public health tool and not useful in the primary care practice setting.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Most primary care providers do not know the overall immunization status of patients in their practices.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Children with delayed immunizations who fail to return for their vaccines should receive case management.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.A 2.B 3.A 4.A

10.3928/0090-4481-20060701-04

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