Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive AMA PRA Category J Credits™ by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the first page of the quiz (see page 448).

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possi ble for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education's Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Dermatology is part of everyday work in the primary care pediatrician's office. Resident physicians often are surprised to discover how much dermatology they practice on a daily basis in their outpatient rotations. Skills often are picked up "along the way" in many training programs despite the fact that a subspecialty of dermatology exists that focuses only on skin diseases in children.

As the largest organ in the human body, the skin serves as a special and ready source of clues to underlying systemic issues in children. From superficial issues such as pyogenic granulomas and pilomatricomas to systemic challenges such as tuberous sclerosis and endocarditis, the skin presents a vast cornucopia of diagnostic challenges and information. We, as pediatricians, have to take up the gauntlet of keeping well educated on changing disease classification and management.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals presents a different format, using several short clinical vignettes to demonstrate illustrative cases in pediatrie dermatology that can be expected to present to the primary care provider in an outpatient setting. Although not an exhaustive review, this issue will leave the participant much better prepared to accurately diagnose and treat skin disorders in children and to serve as an educational resource to their patients and the community.

PRETEST

1. Bleeding after minor trauma is the most common reason for pyogenic granulomas to cometo medical attention.

A. True.

B. False.

2. The safest and most efficacious method for removal of a pilomatricoma is incision and drainage.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Infantile hemangiomas are the most common benign tumors of infancy.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon is a consumptive coagulopathy that can occur with any hemangioma in a child.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.A

2. B

3. A

4.B…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive AMA PRA Category J Credits™ by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the first page of the quiz (see page 448).

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possi ble for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education's Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Dermatology is part of everyday work in the primary care pediatrician's office. Resident physicians often are surprised to discover how much dermatology they practice on a daily basis in their outpatient rotations. Skills often are picked up "along the way" in many training programs despite the fact that a subspecialty of dermatology exists that focuses only on skin diseases in children.

As the largest organ in the human body, the skin serves as a special and ready source of clues to underlying systemic issues in children. From superficial issues such as pyogenic granulomas and pilomatricomas to systemic challenges such as tuberous sclerosis and endocarditis, the skin presents a vast cornucopia of diagnostic challenges and information. We, as pediatricians, have to take up the gauntlet of keeping well educated on changing disease classification and management.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals presents a different format, using several short clinical vignettes to demonstrate illustrative cases in pediatrie dermatology that can be expected to present to the primary care provider in an outpatient setting. Although not an exhaustive review, this issue will leave the participant much better prepared to accurately diagnose and treat skin disorders in children and to serve as an educational resource to their patients and the community.

PRETEST

1. Bleeding after minor trauma is the most common reason for pyogenic granulomas to cometo medical attention.

A. True.

B. False.

2. The safest and most efficacious method for removal of a pilomatricoma is incision and drainage.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Infantile hemangiomas are the most common benign tumors of infancy.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon is a consumptive coagulopathy that can occur with any hemangioma in a child.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.A

2. B

3. A

4.B

10.3928/0090-4481-20060601-04

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents