Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Type 2 diabetes, once thought to be the exclusive realm of the adult internist, now is intruding into the world of the primary care pediatrician. With an ever-increasing number of children appearing in the practitioner's office overweight or at risk for overweight, the incidence of this closely linked complication has continued to rise. Screening for diabetes and insulin resistance quickly are becoming commonplace in this arena, one in which these conditions once were considered exceedingly rare.

As advocates for the health of children, it will rest upon the shoulders of pediatricians to push for healthier food selections in our public and private schools, better and more frequent physical education classes, and less intrusion of private food companies into schools to market their products. These public policy changes will not be enough, unfortunately, to stem the tide of increasing obesity and diabetes in our youth. With each patient encounter, we will have to work individually to restructure patients' daily routines to include more physical activity, fewer sedentary activities such as video games and television, and better dietary choices.

This issue of Pediatric Annals provides four superb articles that serve as a foundation for the pediatrician's education in type 2 diabetes and its complications and comorbidities. In addition, the participant will gain a better understanding of using a structured approach to the child with suspected diabetes and how to best address their treatment.

PRETEST

1. Greater than 35% of Mexican-American and African-American adolescents are overweight.

A. True

B. False

2. Patients with type 2 diabetes do not develop diabetic ketoacidosis.

A. True

B. False

3. Interventions developed for youth with type 1 diabetes and their families should be easily translated to youth with type 2 diabetes and their families.

A True

B. False

4. In the United States, soft drinks are available in 60% of public and private middle and high schools.

A True

B. False

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.B 2. B 3. B 4. A…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Type 2 diabetes, once thought to be the exclusive realm of the adult internist, now is intruding into the world of the primary care pediatrician. With an ever-increasing number of children appearing in the practitioner's office overweight or at risk for overweight, the incidence of this closely linked complication has continued to rise. Screening for diabetes and insulin resistance quickly are becoming commonplace in this arena, one in which these conditions once were considered exceedingly rare.

As advocates for the health of children, it will rest upon the shoulders of pediatricians to push for healthier food selections in our public and private schools, better and more frequent physical education classes, and less intrusion of private food companies into schools to market their products. These public policy changes will not be enough, unfortunately, to stem the tide of increasing obesity and diabetes in our youth. With each patient encounter, we will have to work individually to restructure patients' daily routines to include more physical activity, fewer sedentary activities such as video games and television, and better dietary choices.

This issue of Pediatric Annals provides four superb articles that serve as a foundation for the pediatrician's education in type 2 diabetes and its complications and comorbidities. In addition, the participant will gain a better understanding of using a structured approach to the child with suspected diabetes and how to best address their treatment.

PRETEST

1. Greater than 35% of Mexican-American and African-American adolescents are overweight.

A. True

B. False

2. Patients with type 2 diabetes do not develop diabetic ketoacidosis.

A. True

B. False

3. Interventions developed for youth with type 1 diabetes and their families should be easily translated to youth with type 2 diabetes and their families.

A True

B. False

4. In the United States, soft drinks are available in 60% of public and private middle and high schools.

A True

B. False

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.B 2. B 3. B 4. A

10.3928/0090-4481-20050901-08

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