Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

The muscular dystrophies traditionally were classified by their clinical presentation and inheritance patterns until advances in immuno -hi sto chemical studies made it possible to further delineate the disorders by their muscle involvement As molecular genetic techniques have developed, this traditional system of classification is being challenged and modified.

Pediatricians have always played a special part in the care of children with muscular dystrophy, as they are often the first to suspect the disorder and share a special bond with the families of these children. As the disease progresses, it is the primary care provider who plays a central role in coordinating care and communicating with families and specialists.

Newer models of interdisciplinary care and the concept of the medical home have been developed to answer the needs of patients as they navigate a medical system that is fractionated and confusing. Central to these models is the patient and his or her family as well as the primary care provider. Through the use of these constructs palliative care is being instituted earlier in the disease process and is extending the quality of life as these children progress in their illness.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals presents four excellent reviews of the muscular dystrophies and the role played by medical providers in their care. After reviewing this issue the participant will be better equipped to diagnose and classify muscular dystrophy, interface with cardiac and pulmonary specialists, as well as play a critical role in the interdisciplinary management of these special patients.

PRETEST

1. The most common form of muscular dystrophy is Backer's.

A. True.

B. False.

2. Cardiomyopathy and heart failure are not components of the muscular dystrophy phenotype.

A. True.

B. False.

3. In the muscular dystrophy patient, breathing problems during sleep develop only after daytime symptoms of respiratory muscle weakness have been present for a prolonged period of time.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Interdisciplinary care differs from the multidisciplinary model in that the members of the team along with the patient and parent set treatment goals collaboratively.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.B

2. B

3. B

4. A…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

The muscular dystrophies traditionally were classified by their clinical presentation and inheritance patterns until advances in immuno -hi sto chemical studies made it possible to further delineate the disorders by their muscle involvement As molecular genetic techniques have developed, this traditional system of classification is being challenged and modified.

Pediatricians have always played a special part in the care of children with muscular dystrophy, as they are often the first to suspect the disorder and share a special bond with the families of these children. As the disease progresses, it is the primary care provider who plays a central role in coordinating care and communicating with families and specialists.

Newer models of interdisciplinary care and the concept of the medical home have been developed to answer the needs of patients as they navigate a medical system that is fractionated and confusing. Central to these models is the patient and his or her family as well as the primary care provider. Through the use of these constructs palliative care is being instituted earlier in the disease process and is extending the quality of life as these children progress in their illness.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals presents four excellent reviews of the muscular dystrophies and the role played by medical providers in their care. After reviewing this issue the participant will be better equipped to diagnose and classify muscular dystrophy, interface with cardiac and pulmonary specialists, as well as play a critical role in the interdisciplinary management of these special patients.

PRETEST

1. The most common form of muscular dystrophy is Backer's.

A. True.

B. False.

2. Cardiomyopathy and heart failure are not components of the muscular dystrophy phenotype.

A. True.

B. False.

3. In the muscular dystrophy patient, breathing problems during sleep develop only after daytime symptoms of respiratory muscle weakness have been present for a prolonged period of time.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Interdisciplinary care differs from the multidisciplinary model in that the members of the team along with the patient and parent set treatment goals collaboratively.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.B

2. B

3. B

4. A

10.3928/0090-4481-20050701-08

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