Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Since the first descriptions of nonaccidental trauma in children, the incidence of child abuse reports has increased steadily. Indeed, during the last 2 decades, as society has become more cognizant of this issue, reporting has become more standardized. For example, in all 50 states, physicians are considered mandated reporters for any suspicions of child abuse. One would think, then, that physicians would lead the list of people reporting suspected child abuse, yet they do not. Despite receiving perhaps the best medical training in the world, today's physicians still do not recognize child abuse as readily as they should, nor do they report it often enough when it is suspected.

Yet the visible evidence of child abuse is often minimal, and the children at the greatest risk for becoming victims are often too young to verbalize an accurate history. As physicians who have a moral and ethical duty to advocate for the health, well-being, and safety of our patients, we are required to make the effort to learn how to recognize the potential sequelae of abuse, determine highrisk situations that lead to abuse, and work with child protective services and law enforcement to provide the best evaluation possible in an abusive situation.

This issue of Pediatric Annals provides five excellent reviews of abusive head trauma, physical and sexual abuse, and domestic violence. After reviewing these articles, the reader will be much better prepared to handle abusive situations as they are encountered and can interact with community resources more effectively.…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Since the first descriptions of nonaccidental trauma in children, the incidence of child abuse reports has increased steadily. Indeed, during the last 2 decades, as society has become more cognizant of this issue, reporting has become more standardized. For example, in all 50 states, physicians are considered mandated reporters for any suspicions of child abuse. One would think, then, that physicians would lead the list of people reporting suspected child abuse, yet they do not. Despite receiving perhaps the best medical training in the world, today's physicians still do not recognize child abuse as readily as they should, nor do they report it often enough when it is suspected.

Yet the visible evidence of child abuse is often minimal, and the children at the greatest risk for becoming victims are often too young to verbalize an accurate history. As physicians who have a moral and ethical duty to advocate for the health, well-being, and safety of our patients, we are required to make the effort to learn how to recognize the potential sequelae of abuse, determine highrisk situations that lead to abuse, and work with child protective services and law enforcement to provide the best evaluation possible in an abusive situation.

This issue of Pediatric Annals provides five excellent reviews of abusive head trauma, physical and sexual abuse, and domestic violence. After reviewing these articles, the reader will be much better prepared to handle abusive situations as they are encountered and can interact with community resources more effectively.

10.3928/0090-4481-20050501-09

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