Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

As all child care professionals and parents know, children have an uncanny ability to get into dangerous situations when least expected. Pediatricians must be able to recognize toxidromes in children as part of a rapid response to when a child thwarts our best attempts to keep them away from dangerous substances. Indeed, as medications have become more advanced, their power to heal has only been matched by their power to harm, and the ability to perform "toxic triage" in the rapid assessment of an intoxicated or poisoned child is ever more important.

Children today are being exposed to potent psychotropic medications as pediatrie behavioral health professionals have discovered newer means to treat psychological derangements. However, in some instances these medications have lead to disturbing and, at times, life-threatening adverse reactions. As pediatrie practice increasingly centers on behavioral health issues, it will become part of the practicing professional's responsibility to not only be aware of these potential reactions but also be able to deal with them when they arise.

Adolescents pose a special chailenge as they enter a tumultuous period of evolving self-identity. Here, the therapeutic relationship is built solely on trust and honesty. When drug testing is indicated, knowledge of when to apply such testing and appropriate interpretation of results is crucial in furthering the bond of honesty.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides four excellent reviews on these challenges. After reviewing this volume, the participant will be better able to serve as a resource not only to parents but also to the community in addressing these issues.

PRETEST

1.The majority of poisonings in the pediatrie population result in little or no toxicity.

A. True.

B. False.

2. Toddlers who have normal finger stick glucose readings 6 hours after possible sulfonylurea ingestions may be discharged home.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome has been associated with the atypical a nti psychotics.

A. True.

B. False.

4. A negative drug of abuse screen reliably excludes use of the major classes of drugs within the preceding 72 hours.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.A 2. B 3. A 4. B…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

As all child care professionals and parents know, children have an uncanny ability to get into dangerous situations when least expected. Pediatricians must be able to recognize toxidromes in children as part of a rapid response to when a child thwarts our best attempts to keep them away from dangerous substances. Indeed, as medications have become more advanced, their power to heal has only been matched by their power to harm, and the ability to perform "toxic triage" in the rapid assessment of an intoxicated or poisoned child is ever more important.

Children today are being exposed to potent psychotropic medications as pediatrie behavioral health professionals have discovered newer means to treat psychological derangements. However, in some instances these medications have lead to disturbing and, at times, life-threatening adverse reactions. As pediatrie practice increasingly centers on behavioral health issues, it will become part of the practicing professional's responsibility to not only be aware of these potential reactions but also be able to deal with them when they arise.

Adolescents pose a special chailenge as they enter a tumultuous period of evolving self-identity. Here, the therapeutic relationship is built solely on trust and honesty. When drug testing is indicated, knowledge of when to apply such testing and appropriate interpretation of results is crucial in furthering the bond of honesty.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides four excellent reviews on these challenges. After reviewing this volume, the participant will be better able to serve as a resource not only to parents but also to the community in addressing these issues.

PRETEST

1.The majority of poisonings in the pediatrie population result in little or no toxicity.

A. True.

B. False.

2. Toddlers who have normal finger stick glucose readings 6 hours after possible sulfonylurea ingestions may be discharged home.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome has been associated with the atypical a nti psychotics.

A. True.

B. False.

4. A negative drug of abuse screen reliably excludes use of the major classes of drugs within the preceding 72 hours.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.A 2. B 3. A 4. B

10.3928/0090-4481-20051201-08

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