Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Pediatric residency training, in the past and still today, relies heavily on the inpatient experience and specialty outpatient rotations to educate house staff on emergency preparedness. The continuity experience often is limited to well childcare and management of ongoing chronic medical problems. Indeed, for most residents in training, it is a surprise to enter daily general practice and realize that the majority of their daily work surrounds management of minor acute illnesses, behavioral counseling, and disease screening.

However, within the mundane activities of daily practice lies the trap of not staying prepared for and aware of the emergencies that can occur quite suddenly. As many seasoned practitioners have learned, appointments rarely arrive as advertised, and children can progress from mildly ill to severely ill in a very short period of time. Children may harbor chronic metabolic, cardiac, or pulmonary disorders long before ever displaying any severe symptoms. At times, even our own therapy regimen may produce significant illness. In all these cases, it is a constant state of vigilance and a well-educated high index of suspicion that puts the pediatrician in a unique position to respond to such emergencies.

This issue of Pediatric Annals provides reviews of four areas in which emergencies may appear in the general office. After completing this issue, the participant will have a clearer understanding of the steps necessary to prepare the office for effective responses to emergencies, as well as a more complete knowledge base of potential emergencies that may appear during daily practice.

PRETEST

1. Treatment for status epilepticus should not be undertaken until at least 30 minutes of continuous seizure activity has been documented.

A True.

B. False.

2. The most common etiology for syncope in pediatric patients is neurocardiogenic (vasovagal).

A. True.

B. False.

3. Males with classic salt-wasting congenital adrenal hyperplasia present with ambiguous genitalia at birth.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy for viral bronchiolitis.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST: 1.B 2.A 3.B 4.B…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Pediatric residency training, in the past and still today, relies heavily on the inpatient experience and specialty outpatient rotations to educate house staff on emergency preparedness. The continuity experience often is limited to well childcare and management of ongoing chronic medical problems. Indeed, for most residents in training, it is a surprise to enter daily general practice and realize that the majority of their daily work surrounds management of minor acute illnesses, behavioral counseling, and disease screening.

However, within the mundane activities of daily practice lies the trap of not staying prepared for and aware of the emergencies that can occur quite suddenly. As many seasoned practitioners have learned, appointments rarely arrive as advertised, and children can progress from mildly ill to severely ill in a very short period of time. Children may harbor chronic metabolic, cardiac, or pulmonary disorders long before ever displaying any severe symptoms. At times, even our own therapy regimen may produce significant illness. In all these cases, it is a constant state of vigilance and a well-educated high index of suspicion that puts the pediatrician in a unique position to respond to such emergencies.

This issue of Pediatric Annals provides reviews of four areas in which emergencies may appear in the general office. After completing this issue, the participant will have a clearer understanding of the steps necessary to prepare the office for effective responses to emergencies, as well as a more complete knowledge base of potential emergencies that may appear during daily practice.

PRETEST

1. Treatment for status epilepticus should not be undertaken until at least 30 minutes of continuous seizure activity has been documented.

A True.

B. False.

2. The most common etiology for syncope in pediatric patients is neurocardiogenic (vasovagal).

A. True.

B. False.

3. Males with classic salt-wasting congenital adrenal hyperplasia present with ambiguous genitalia at birth.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy for viral bronchiolitis.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST: 1.B 2.A 3.B 4.B

10.3928/0090-4481-20051101-08

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