Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Unlike many medical professionals, those dealing with children enjoy the privilege of contributing to the healthy psychosocial development of each patient. Every medical intervention with a child must be considered in the context of how it will be perceived through a child's eyes. Because of this role, many parents rely on the pediatrician as a source of information on how to deal with challenging behaviors, from normal to disturbing. This is an opinion not only held by parents of patients but society as well.

Increasingly, the office pediatrician is asked to help in the management of misconduct in children. Here the medical professional must be able to distinguish normal misconduct from truly aberrant human behavior. Disorders of attention (eg, ADHD) must be differentiated from attentional difficulty as part of a wider symptom complex of conduct disorders. Providing care to these children and their families takes skill, patience, time, and a true dedication to staying well versed in changing pharmacotherapy and counseling modalities.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides four excellent reviews of child misconduct, aggression, and juvenile delinquency with an emphasis on new models for evaluation and management.

PRETEST

1. Benzodiazepines may be a useful first- or second-line agent for the treatment of chronic maladaptive aggression.

A. True.

B. False.

2. Conduct disorder is a repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in children and adolescents that violates the basic rights of others.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Psychophysiological findings in disruptive children and adolescents provide evidence that persistent child misconduct is solely a reaction to social context.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Research studies have uncovered characteristic neuropsychological deficits related to juvenile delinquency.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1. B 2. A 3. B 4. A…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Unlike many medical professionals, those dealing with children enjoy the privilege of contributing to the healthy psychosocial development of each patient. Every medical intervention with a child must be considered in the context of how it will be perceived through a child's eyes. Because of this role, many parents rely on the pediatrician as a source of information on how to deal with challenging behaviors, from normal to disturbing. This is an opinion not only held by parents of patients but society as well.

Increasingly, the office pediatrician is asked to help in the management of misconduct in children. Here the medical professional must be able to distinguish normal misconduct from truly aberrant human behavior. Disorders of attention (eg, ADHD) must be differentiated from attentional difficulty as part of a wider symptom complex of conduct disorders. Providing care to these children and their families takes skill, patience, time, and a true dedication to staying well versed in changing pharmacotherapy and counseling modalities.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides four excellent reviews of child misconduct, aggression, and juvenile delinquency with an emphasis on new models for evaluation and management.

PRETEST

1. Benzodiazepines may be a useful first- or second-line agent for the treatment of chronic maladaptive aggression.

A. True.

B. False.

2. Conduct disorder is a repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in children and adolescents that violates the basic rights of others.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Psychophysiological findings in disruptive children and adolescents provide evidence that persistent child misconduct is solely a reaction to social context.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Research studies have uncovered characteristic neuropsychological deficits related to juvenile delinquency.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1. B 2. A 3. B 4. A

10.3928/0090-4481-20040501-07

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