Pediatric Annals

about the guest editor

Abstract

Dr. Ansar Haroun was born in Pakistan, and raised in Europe. He first came to the United States as a Roosevelt Scholar and returned for his psychiatry and epidemiology training at Yale University and his pediatrie psychiatry training at Columbia University.

While in training, he became interested in bad behavior, from both a medical-psychiatric perspective and ethical-legal perspective. He was, therefore, happy to join the San Diego Superior Court, where he supervises the Forensic Psychiatry Clinic, which looks at a variety of forensic cases, both criminal and civil. His clinic is the training site for a medical student elective "Law, Logic and Ethics in Medicine," and as a clinical professor of psychiatry and pediatrics and an adjunct professor of law, he enjoys teaching.

He has published in the areas of informed consent, deceptions of doctors, religious delusions, terrorism, wickedness, and conduct disorder. He promotes a more rigorous diagnostic approach to conduct disorder, which would better separate the disease from its imposter, disordered conduct.

His wife (Nasra Haroun, MD, also a child psychiatrist) does not allow fighting in the home, so he joined the Army Reserve and recently returned from a deployment in Afghanistan.…

Dr. Ansar Haroun was born in Pakistan, and raised in Europe. He first came to the United States as a Roosevelt Scholar and returned for his psychiatry and epidemiology training at Yale University and his pediatrie psychiatry training at Columbia University.

While in training, he became interested in bad behavior, from both a medical-psychiatric perspective and ethical-legal perspective. He was, therefore, happy to join the San Diego Superior Court, where he supervises the Forensic Psychiatry Clinic, which looks at a variety of forensic cases, both criminal and civil. His clinic is the training site for a medical student elective "Law, Logic and Ethics in Medicine," and as a clinical professor of psychiatry and pediatrics and an adjunct professor of law, he enjoys teaching.

He has published in the areas of informed consent, deceptions of doctors, religious delusions, terrorism, wickedness, and conduct disorder. He promotes a more rigorous diagnostic approach to conduct disorder, which would better separate the disease from its imposter, disordered conduct.

His wife (Nasra Haroun, MD, also a child psychiatrist) does not allow fighting in the home, so he joined the Army Reserve and recently returned from a deployment in Afghanistan.

10.3928/0090-4481-20040501-05

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