Pediatric Annals

cme pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Society values tallness and puts those with short stature at a disadvantage. Therefore, it is not surprising that parents are concerned when their child does not appear to be growing welt. As child healthcare providers, we are called on to follow the physical and psychological development of children carefully. We must stay aware of growth patterns that indicate growth hormone failure or resistance and those that are indicative of a normal delay in linear growth.

Before the development of recombinant growth hormone, children with short stature were given few options to improve their ultimate adult height. Advances in recombinant technology have now made human growth hormone both readily available and safe from prion contamination. Studies of efficacy and safety are opening up possibilities for new indications for the use of this agent.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides four excellent articles on short stature and the appropriate application of human growth hormone therapy. After reviewing these articles the reader will be better prepared to evaluate a child with short stature and determine when reassurance or a referral is in order.

PRETEST

1. Infants presenting with thyroid or growth hormone deficiencies have normal fetal growth and are usually normal in weight and length at birth.

A. True.

B. False.

2. In children with constitutional delay of growth, there is often a strong family history of "late bloomers."

A. True.

B. False.

3. Currently licensed growth hormone products are produced by recombinant DNA technology and have not been associated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Turner syndrome affects 1 in every 10,000 live-born females.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1. A 2. A 3. A 4.6…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Society values tallness and puts those with short stature at a disadvantage. Therefore, it is not surprising that parents are concerned when their child does not appear to be growing welt. As child healthcare providers, we are called on to follow the physical and psychological development of children carefully. We must stay aware of growth patterns that indicate growth hormone failure or resistance and those that are indicative of a normal delay in linear growth.

Before the development of recombinant growth hormone, children with short stature were given few options to improve their ultimate adult height. Advances in recombinant technology have now made human growth hormone both readily available and safe from prion contamination. Studies of efficacy and safety are opening up possibilities for new indications for the use of this agent.

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides four excellent articles on short stature and the appropriate application of human growth hormone therapy. After reviewing these articles the reader will be better prepared to evaluate a child with short stature and determine when reassurance or a referral is in order.

PRETEST

1. Infants presenting with thyroid or growth hormone deficiencies have normal fetal growth and are usually normal in weight and length at birth.

A. True.

B. False.

2. In children with constitutional delay of growth, there is often a strong family history of "late bloomers."

A. True.

B. False.

3. Currently licensed growth hormone products are produced by recombinant DNA technology and have not been associated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Turner syndrome affects 1 in every 10,000 live-born females.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1. A 2. A 3. A 4.6

10.3928/0090-4481-20040301-07

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