Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Before the implementation of universal newborn hearing screening, the average time to make the diagnosis of hearing loss in a child was nearly 3 years. Thanks to the commitment of the American Academy of Pediatrics and other organizations, most states now screen all newborns for hearing loss. It is sobering to find that up to 6 per 1,000 live born infants may have profound hearing loss.

With the first year of life so crucial to an infant's speech development, the pediatrician plays a pivotal role in preventing and treating insults to the hearing apparatus. At one time, this was accomplished through the aggressive antimicrobial treatment of acute otitis media. Today, we realize the natural history of this entity is to resolve spontaneously in many children, which allows us a more staged, conservative approach. Indeed, in those children with tympanostomy tubes, newer topical agents have proven much more effective than traditional oral systemic therapy.

The acquisition of spoken language and unique speech patterns is one of the hallmarks of the human species. Children who do not develop normal speech due to hearing impairment suffer socially and economically. The practicing pediatrician, today more than at any other time in medical history, is in a position to make a sincere difference for the better for children with hearing loss, regardless of the cause. This issue of Pediatric Annals provides four comprehensive reviews that will prepare primary care providers to accomplish this goal of bettering a child's world.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.B 2. A 3. A 4. B…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Before the implementation of universal newborn hearing screening, the average time to make the diagnosis of hearing loss in a child was nearly 3 years. Thanks to the commitment of the American Academy of Pediatrics and other organizations, most states now screen all newborns for hearing loss. It is sobering to find that up to 6 per 1,000 live born infants may have profound hearing loss.

With the first year of life so crucial to an infant's speech development, the pediatrician plays a pivotal role in preventing and treating insults to the hearing apparatus. At one time, this was accomplished through the aggressive antimicrobial treatment of acute otitis media. Today, we realize the natural history of this entity is to resolve spontaneously in many children, which allows us a more staged, conservative approach. Indeed, in those children with tympanostomy tubes, newer topical agents have proven much more effective than traditional oral systemic therapy.

The acquisition of spoken language and unique speech patterns is one of the hallmarks of the human species. Children who do not develop normal speech due to hearing impairment suffer socially and economically. The practicing pediatrician, today more than at any other time in medical history, is in a position to make a sincere difference for the better for children with hearing loss, regardless of the cause. This issue of Pediatric Annals provides four comprehensive reviews that will prepare primary care providers to accomplish this goal of bettering a child's world.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1.B 2. A 3. A 4. B

10.3928/0090-4481-20041201-06

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