Pediatric Annals

CME Pretest

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

It was once said, half jokingly, that the great winged vector of human disease was not a mosquito, not a comoii housefly, but rather a 747. As more and more people turn to air travel as an inexpensive means of transportation, no longer can that statement be considered in jest. Indeed, despite the events of September 11, 2001, adults and children from the United States still seize the oppotunity to travel abroad in increasing numbers every year.

Immigration to the United States, albeit severely limited by border security, still continues at a brisk pace. Children and parents from all corners of the globe travel to the continent to seek higher education, pursue advanced degrees, or simply to seek a better life free from oppression. As domestic adoptions have become increasingly difficult and expensive, moer couples have chosen to look overseas for orphaned or abandoned children.

These factors place a new challenge before the practicing pediatrician. How best to prepare a family for foreign travel to maximize their enjoyment of a unique experienc, while still assuring their safety from infectious and parasitic diseases? With immigration and foreign adoptions, we must stay aware of the effect of poor nutrition on the overall health and development of a child. As well, the worldwide scourge of tuberculosis, although not yet visited on our shores to an equal magnitude, can easily appear in our communities via an asymptomatic or undiagnosed child.

This issue of Pediatric Annals provides four excellent reviews of these concerns. A separate article provides a front line view of the challenges faced by clinicians in developing countries. After reviewing the contents of this volume, the participant will be much better prepared to counsel families preparing for foreign travel, as well as assist in the care of children immigrating from foreign countries.

PRETEST

1. HIV/AIDS is the leading cause of death in children under age 5 worldwide.

A. True.

B. False.

2. A child can be iron deficient and still have a normal hemoglobin level.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and amoxicillin are not appropriate agents for the treatment of traveler's diarrhea in children.

A. True.

B. False.

4. 14 mm induration in a 12-year-old child who receivedbacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination at birth is most likely due to BCG and should not be considered positive.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1. B 2.A 3.A 4. B…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your current knowledge of the material before reading further.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

It was once said, half jokingly, that the great winged vector of human disease was not a mosquito, not a comoii housefly, but rather a 747. As more and more people turn to air travel as an inexpensive means of transportation, no longer can that statement be considered in jest. Indeed, despite the events of September 11, 2001, adults and children from the United States still seize the oppotunity to travel abroad in increasing numbers every year.

Immigration to the United States, albeit severely limited by border security, still continues at a brisk pace. Children and parents from all corners of the globe travel to the continent to seek higher education, pursue advanced degrees, or simply to seek a better life free from oppression. As domestic adoptions have become increasingly difficult and expensive, moer couples have chosen to look overseas for orphaned or abandoned children.

These factors place a new challenge before the practicing pediatrician. How best to prepare a family for foreign travel to maximize their enjoyment of a unique experienc, while still assuring their safety from infectious and parasitic diseases? With immigration and foreign adoptions, we must stay aware of the effect of poor nutrition on the overall health and development of a child. As well, the worldwide scourge of tuberculosis, although not yet visited on our shores to an equal magnitude, can easily appear in our communities via an asymptomatic or undiagnosed child.

This issue of Pediatric Annals provides four excellent reviews of these concerns. A separate article provides a front line view of the challenges faced by clinicians in developing countries. After reviewing the contents of this volume, the participant will be much better prepared to counsel families preparing for foreign travel, as well as assist in the care of children immigrating from foreign countries.

PRETEST

1. HIV/AIDS is the leading cause of death in children under age 5 worldwide.

A. True.

B. False.

2. A child can be iron deficient and still have a normal hemoglobin level.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and amoxicillin are not appropriate agents for the treatment of traveler's diarrhea in children.

A. True.

B. False.

4. 14 mm induration in a 12-year-old child who receivedbacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination at birth is most likely due to BCG and should not be considered positive.

A. True.

B. False.

ANSWERS TO THE PRETEST:

1. B 2.A 3.A 4. B

10.3928/0090-4481-20041001-07

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