Pediatric Annals

FROM THE GUEST EDITOR: Issues in Topical Therapy for Children: Not Only Skin-Deep

Elaine C Siegfried, MD

Abstract

One-fourth of children seen by primary care physicians have a skinrelated problem, and it may not be only skin-deep. Pediatric health care providers must be knowledgeable about the differential diagnosis of cutaneous signs and symptoms, as well as the ever-expanding scope of topical and systemic dermatologie therapy. This issue of Pediatric Annals explores many of the issues related to dermatologie therapy in children.

Dr. Ward provides an overview of past and present legislation enacted to support the study of drug safety and efficacy in children. There are few topically applied medications that currently have pediatric indications approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

This subject is particularly important to infants and young children receiving topical therapy, as summarized by Dr. Spray and myself in our article on dermatologie toxicity.

Drs. Bruckner and Weston provide a concise and informative summary of the common, but often unrecognized, and sometimes iatrogenic problem of pediatric allergic contact dermatitis.

Mr. Orchard and Dr. Weston discuss the importance of the vehicle in prescribing topical treatments.

Drs. Valencia, Falabella, and Schachner provide an update on innovations in wound care for infants and children.

Dr. Howard's critical appraisal of topical antimicrobial agents provides guidance for this class of overused agents.

Dr. Raimer provides guidelines for the safe and effective use of topical corticosteroids, one of the mainstays of dermatologie therapy.

Together, these articles are a useful resource for quick referral when seeing the many children who need treatment for skin problems.…

One-fourth of children seen by primary care physicians have a skinrelated problem, and it may not be only skin-deep. Pediatric health care providers must be knowledgeable about the differential diagnosis of cutaneous signs and symptoms, as well as the ever-expanding scope of topical and systemic dermatologie therapy. This issue of Pediatric Annals explores many of the issues related to dermatologie therapy in children.

Dr. Ward provides an overview of past and present legislation enacted to support the study of drug safety and efficacy in children. There are few topically applied medications that currently have pediatric indications approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

This subject is particularly important to infants and young children receiving topical therapy, as summarized by Dr. Spray and myself in our article on dermatologie toxicity.

Drs. Bruckner and Weston provide a concise and informative summary of the common, but often unrecognized, and sometimes iatrogenic problem of pediatric allergic contact dermatitis.

Mr. Orchard and Dr. Weston discuss the importance of the vehicle in prescribing topical treatments.

Drs. Valencia, Falabella, and Schachner provide an update on innovations in wound care for infants and children.

Dr. Howard's critical appraisal of topical antimicrobial agents provides guidance for this class of overused agents.

Dr. Raimer provides guidelines for the safe and effective use of topical corticosteroids, one of the mainstays of dermatologie therapy.

Together, these articles are a useful resource for quick referral when seeing the many children who need treatment for skin problems.

10.3928/0090-4481-20010401-05

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