Pediatric Annals

CME quiz

Abstract

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Review the stated learning objectives on the first page of the CME articles and determine if these objectives match your individual learning needs.

2. Read the articles carefully. Do not neglect the tables and other illustrative materials, as they have been selected to enhance your knowledge and understanding.

3. The following quiz questions have been designed to provide a useful link between the CME articles in the issue and your everyday practice. Read each question, choose the correct answer, and record your answer on the CME REGISTRATtON FORM at the end of the quiz. Retain a copy of your answers so that they can be compared with the correct answers that will be published later.

4. Type or print your full name and address and your date of birth in the space provided on the CME REGISTRATION FORM.

5. Complete the Evaluation portion of the CME Registration Form. Forms and quizzes cannot be processed if the Evaluation portion is incomplete. The Evaluation portion of the CME Registration Form will be separated from the quiz upon receipt at PEDIATRIC ANNALS. Your evaluation of this activity will in no way affect the scoring of your quiz.

6. Send the completed form, with your $25 payment (check, money order, or credit card information) to: PEDIATRIC ANNALS CME Quiz, PO Box 36, Thorofare NJ 08086.

7. Your answers will be graded, and you will be advised whether you have passed or failed. Unanswered questions will be considered incorrect. A score of at least 80% is required to pass. Answers to the quiz will be published 3 months after the article appears. You should review your answers at that time, noting your incorrect answers, and referring to the article and its supplemental bibliography for additional information and clarification.

8. Be sure to mail the CME Registration Form on or before the deadline listed. After that date, the quiz will close and correct answers will appear in the Journal. CME Registration Forms received after the date listed will not be processed.

CME ACCREDITATION

SLACK Incorporated, publisher of PEDIATRIC ANNALS, is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to sponsor continuing medical education for physicians. SLACK Incorporated designates this educational activity for a maximum of three (3) hours in category 1 toward the AMA Physician's Recognition Award. Each physician should only claim those hours of credit that he or she actually spent in the educational activity.

Sports Medicine

Questions 1 through 7 are taken from the article, "The Preparticipation Athletic Examination: A Closer Look," by Daniel P. Krowchuk, MD.

1. Each of the following are advantages of multiple-station preparticipation athletic examinations (PAEs) except:

A. Permit evaluation of large numbers of athletes rapidly and efficiently.

B. Allow evaluation of medical and social issues unrelated to athletic participation.

C. Are cost effective.

D. May be more effective than single examiner PAEs in detecting musculoskeletal problems.

2. In the PAE, the history can detect approximately what percent of conditions that might affect safe and effective participation:

A. 10%.

B. 30%.

C. 50%.

D. 70%.

3. The majority of sudden nontraumatic deaths in young athletes result from:

A. Heat stroke.

B. Occult cardiac disease.

C. Malignant hyperthermia.

D. Status asthmaticus.

4. Symptoms that may suggest underlying cardiac disease in young athletes include:

A. Chest pain with exercise.

B. Syncope during exertion.

C. Both A and B.

D. Neither A nor B.

5. Which of the following laboratory studies are currently recommended in the routine PAE:

A. Complete blood cell count.

B. Urinalysis.

C. Serum ferritin.

D. None of the above.

6. According to the Committee on Sports…

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Review the stated learning objectives on the first page of the CME articles and determine if these objectives match your individual learning needs.

2. Read the articles carefully. Do not neglect the tables and other illustrative materials, as they have been selected to enhance your knowledge and understanding.

3. The following quiz questions have been designed to provide a useful link between the CME articles in the issue and your everyday practice. Read each question, choose the correct answer, and record your answer on the CME REGISTRATtON FORM at the end of the quiz. Retain a copy of your answers so that they can be compared with the correct answers that will be published later.

4. Type or print your full name and address and your date of birth in the space provided on the CME REGISTRATION FORM.

5. Complete the Evaluation portion of the CME Registration Form. Forms and quizzes cannot be processed if the Evaluation portion is incomplete. The Evaluation portion of the CME Registration Form will be separated from the quiz upon receipt at PEDIATRIC ANNALS. Your evaluation of this activity will in no way affect the scoring of your quiz.

6. Send the completed form, with your $25 payment (check, money order, or credit card information) to: PEDIATRIC ANNALS CME Quiz, PO Box 36, Thorofare NJ 08086.

7. Your answers will be graded, and you will be advised whether you have passed or failed. Unanswered questions will be considered incorrect. A score of at least 80% is required to pass. Answers to the quiz will be published 3 months after the article appears. You should review your answers at that time, noting your incorrect answers, and referring to the article and its supplemental bibliography for additional information and clarification.

8. Be sure to mail the CME Registration Form on or before the deadline listed. After that date, the quiz will close and correct answers will appear in the Journal. CME Registration Forms received after the date listed will not be processed.

CME ACCREDITATION

SLACK Incorporated, publisher of PEDIATRIC ANNALS, is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to sponsor continuing medical education for physicians. SLACK Incorporated designates this educational activity for a maximum of three (3) hours in category 1 toward the AMA Physician's Recognition Award. Each physician should only claim those hours of credit that he or she actually spent in the educational activity.

Sports Medicine

Questions 1 through 7 are taken from the article, "The Preparticipation Athletic Examination: A Closer Look," by Daniel P. Krowchuk, MD.

1. Each of the following are advantages of multiple-station preparticipation athletic examinations (PAEs) except:

A. Permit evaluation of large numbers of athletes rapidly and efficiently.

B. Allow evaluation of medical and social issues unrelated to athletic participation.

C. Are cost effective.

D. May be more effective than single examiner PAEs in detecting musculoskeletal problems.

2. In the PAE, the history can detect approximately what percent of conditions that might affect safe and effective participation:

A. 10%.

B. 30%.

C. 50%.

D. 70%.

3. The majority of sudden nontraumatic deaths in young athletes result from:

A. Heat stroke.

B. Occult cardiac disease.

C. Malignant hyperthermia.

D. Status asthmaticus.

4. Symptoms that may suggest underlying cardiac disease in young athletes include:

A. Chest pain with exercise.

B. Syncope during exertion.

C. Both A and B.

D. Neither A nor B.

5. Which of the following laboratory studies are currently recommended in the routine PAE:

A. Complete blood cell count.

B. Urinalysis.

C. Serum ferritin.

D. None of the above.

6. According to the Committee on Sports Medicine, which of the following is not a "contact/collision" sport:

A. Basketball.

B, Diving.

C. Baseball.

D. Water polo.

7. Which of the following medical conditions is an absolute contraindication to participation:

A. Fever.

B. Absence of one eye.

C. Athlete is an organ transplant recipient.

D. Absent testicle.

Questions 8 through 13 are taken from the article, "The Acutely Injured Knee," by Chris G. Koutures, MD, and Gregory L. Landry, MD.

8. A football lineman receives a blow to the outside of his knee and later reports instability and pain on the medial side. Examination reveals excessive laxity with the knee in full extension. This is suggestive of:

A. Medial collateral ligament injury.

B. Anterior cruciate ligament injury.

C. Anterior cruciate ligament injury with patellar instability.

D. Medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament injury.

9. A skier sustains a mild medial collateral ligament sprain. Which of the following statements is true regarding the use of a knee immobilizer:

A. The immobilizer should not be removed until the knee is reexamined.

B. The immobilizer should be removed several times a day for icing and range of motion exercises.

C. The knee should be immobilized in full extension.

D. None of the above.

10. A 17-year-old soccer player suffers a fall during a game and reports swelling within 24 hours of the injury as well as pain on the lateral surface of the ioint. Examination reveals lateral tenderness at the joint line, a normal Lacriman test, and pain on lateral compression during the McMurray test. The most likely injury is:

A. Lateral meniscus injury.

B. Anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

C. Lateral collateral ligament sprain.

D. Patellar subluxation.

11. Which of the following ligaments prevents excessive anterior motion of the tibia on the femur and excessive internal rotation of the tibia on the femur:

A. Anterior cruciate ligament.

B. Posterior cruciate ligament.

C. Lateral collateral ligament.

D. Medial collateral ligament.

12. During performance of the Lachman test, the knee is flexed to:

A. 45°.

B. 20°.

C. 70°.

D. Fully extended.

13. Indications for radiographs In an acute knee injury Include which of the following:

A. A large effusion.

B. Decreased range of motion.

C. Both A and B.

D. Neither A nor B.

Questions 14 through 20 are taken from the article, "Management of Ankle Sprains," by Joseph N. Chorley, MD, and Albert C. Hergenroeder, MD.

14. The ligaments that protect the ankle from inversion stress Include which of the following:

A. The anterior tatofibular ligament.

B. The calcaneof ibular ligament.

C. The posterior talofibular ligament.

D. All of the above.

15. A 15-year-old athlete presents to your office after an inversion injury to the left ankle. You note generalized tenderness, some hemorrhage, and decreased range of motion. The patient Is unable to run or hop but can walk with a limp. This injury is best classified as a:

A. Grade I sprain.

B. Grade Il sprain.

C. Grade III sprain.

D. None of the above.

16. How is function of the proneus brevis best assessed:

A. With the foot plantar flexed with resisted active eversión.

B. With the foot plantar flexed with resisted active inversion.

C. With the foot dorsiflexed with resisted active eversión.

D. With the foot dorsiflexed with resisted active inversion.

17. A patient with a sprained right ankle presents to your office. Examination reveals a negative drawer test and inversion stress test, and positive pain on compression of the distal tibia and fibula. This sign indicates:

A. Incompetent anterior talofibular ligament.

B. Incompetent calcaneofibular ligament.

C. Tearing of the tibiofibular syndesmosis.

D. None of the above.

18. According to the Ottawa Rules for management of ankle sprains, a radiograph of the ankle is indicated if the patient exhibits pain In the area of the m a leo 1 1 and:

A. Inability to bear weight immediately after the injury and in the emergency department/clinic.

B. Bone tenderness at the posterior edge of the distal tibia or fibula.

C. Both A or B.

D. Neither A nor B.

19. Which of the following ankle injuries require specialty evaluation:

A. Jones's fracture.

B. Peroneal subluxation.

C. Unstable fractures.

D. All of the above.

20. Endpoints to successful care of a sprained ankle include regaining which of the following:

A. Full strength.

B. Full range of motion.

C. Normal proprtoception.

D. All of the above.

10.3928/0090-4481-19970101-12

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