Pediatric Annals

CME PRETEST

Abstract

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Perhaps no other facet of our society is changing at a faster pace than the effect the media has on our perceptions of reality. Our children are in a particularly vulnerable position given the amount of media exposure they face each day. This issue of Pediatric Annals addresses the various forms of media and how they affect the developmental, societal, and educational performance of America's children. Also, approaches to how the media can be used to enhance health perception and education are reviewed.

After review of this issue, practitioners will: 1 ) have a better appreciation of the challenges faced by today's children as they interact with various forms of media, 2) be better prepared to answer questions from parents about the risks associated with media exposure, and 3) be better equipped to suggest preventive measures parents can use to help their children cope with and control their media exposure.

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category I credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRETEST

1. Television scenes depicting intercourse between unmarried couples are rated "sexier" by high school students compared with scenes depicting intercourse between married couples:

A. True.

B. False.

2. If you had the same budget, you could sell health on television as easy as you sell basketball shoes:

A. True.

B. False.

3. By the time they graduate from high school, American teenagers will have spent considerably more time in front of the television than in a classroom:

A. True.

B. False.

4. Playing video games may trigger seizures in susceptible individuals:

A. True.

B. False.

Answers to the Pretest:

1. A

2. B

3. A

4. A…

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Perhaps no other facet of our society is changing at a faster pace than the effect the media has on our perceptions of reality. Our children are in a particularly vulnerable position given the amount of media exposure they face each day. This issue of Pediatric Annals addresses the various forms of media and how they affect the developmental, societal, and educational performance of America's children. Also, approaches to how the media can be used to enhance health perception and education are reviewed.

After review of this issue, practitioners will: 1 ) have a better appreciation of the challenges faced by today's children as they interact with various forms of media, 2) be better prepared to answer questions from parents about the risks associated with media exposure, and 3) be better equipped to suggest preventive measures parents can use to help their children cope with and control their media exposure.

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category I credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRETEST

1. Television scenes depicting intercourse between unmarried couples are rated "sexier" by high school students compared with scenes depicting intercourse between married couples:

A. True.

B. False.

2. If you had the same budget, you could sell health on television as easy as you sell basketball shoes:

A. True.

B. False.

3. By the time they graduate from high school, American teenagers will have spent considerably more time in front of the television than in a classroom:

A. True.

B. False.

4. Playing video games may trigger seizures in susceptible individuals:

A. True.

B. False.

Answers to the Pretest:

1. A

2. B

3. A

4. A

10.3928/0090-4481-19950201-03

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