Pediatric Annals

CME PRETEST

Abstract

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Juvenile insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus [IDDM) remains by far the most common endocrine deficiency disorder that pediatricians deal with in daily practice. This issue of Pediatrie Annals offers a series of up-to-date articles on new developments related to the patient care of children and adolescents with this disorder, and with its resultant sequelae and complications. The concluding article in this issue offers a treatise on the current approaches to the prevention and delay of IDDM itself, and to the prevention and 1 99Os treatment of diabetes complications, primarily retinopathy and nephropathy.

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category I credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRETEST

1 . Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKAJ Is always caused by insulin deficiency, either relative or absolute.

A. True.

B. False.

2. With Improved critical care management over the last two decades, there has been a significant decrease in the case fatality rate for children admitted to hospitals with DKA.

A. True.

B. False.

3. The occurrence of periodic severe hypoglycemia is a major impediment to the goal of achieving relatively tight blood glucose control in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients.

A. True.

B. False.

4. The percentage of new patients with IDDM who have no close relative with the disease approximates:

A. 33%.

B. 67%.

C. 90%.

Answers to the Pretest:

1.A 2.B 3.A 4.C…

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Juvenile insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus [IDDM) remains by far the most common endocrine deficiency disorder that pediatricians deal with in daily practice. This issue of Pediatrie Annals offers a series of up-to-date articles on new developments related to the patient care of children and adolescents with this disorder, and with its resultant sequelae and complications. The concluding article in this issue offers a treatise on the current approaches to the prevention and delay of IDDM itself, and to the prevention and 1 99Os treatment of diabetes complications, primarily retinopathy and nephropathy.

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category I credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRETEST

1 . Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKAJ Is always caused by insulin deficiency, either relative or absolute.

A. True.

B. False.

2. With Improved critical care management over the last two decades, there has been a significant decrease in the case fatality rate for children admitted to hospitals with DKA.

A. True.

B. False.

3. The occurrence of periodic severe hypoglycemia is a major impediment to the goal of achieving relatively tight blood glucose control in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients.

A. True.

B. False.

4. The percentage of new patients with IDDM who have no close relative with the disease approximates:

A. 33%.

B. 67%.

C. 90%.

Answers to the Pretest:

1.A 2.B 3.A 4.C

10.3928/0090-4481-19940601-03

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