Pediatric Annals

CME PRE-TEST

Abstract

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

To emphasize to pediatric practitioners that children with significant brain injuries have problems that are not only physical, but also cognitive and behavioral, and to stress that brain injuries do not occur at random because there are many high-risk factors relative to traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the pediatric age group. This issue of Pediatric Annals offers the current knowledge base on the epidemiology and prevention, the acute care management, and the prognosis and rehabilitation of pediatric TBI, and outlines the total impact of brain injuries on children and their families.

Concluding articles emphasize family functioning, dynamics, and educational implications of brain injuries and provide practitioners with current knowledge and understanding to help in their total management care and support to families of braininjured children.

HOWTO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category I credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRETEST

1 . The leading cause of trauma death in children is:

A. Multiple abdominal injury.

B. Brain injury.

C. Thoracic injury.

2. Less than half of patients who die from traumatic brain injury do so before ever reaching a hospital.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Following childhood trauma, the absence of a skull fracture reliably excludes a significant intracranial injury.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Mild traumatic brain injury and concussion in childhood do not appear to cause long-term problems in children.

A. True.

B. False.

Answers to the Pretest:

1 B

2 B

3 B

4. A…

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

To emphasize to pediatric practitioners that children with significant brain injuries have problems that are not only physical, but also cognitive and behavioral, and to stress that brain injuries do not occur at random because there are many high-risk factors relative to traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the pediatric age group. This issue of Pediatric Annals offers the current knowledge base on the epidemiology and prevention, the acute care management, and the prognosis and rehabilitation of pediatric TBI, and outlines the total impact of brain injuries on children and their families.

Concluding articles emphasize family functioning, dynamics, and educational implications of brain injuries and provide practitioners with current knowledge and understanding to help in their total management care and support to families of braininjured children.

HOWTO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category I credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRETEST

1 . The leading cause of trauma death in children is:

A. Multiple abdominal injury.

B. Brain injury.

C. Thoracic injury.

2. Less than half of patients who die from traumatic brain injury do so before ever reaching a hospital.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Following childhood trauma, the absence of a skull fracture reliably excludes a significant intracranial injury.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Mild traumatic brain injury and concussion in childhood do not appear to cause long-term problems in children.

A. True.

B. False.

Answers to the Pretest:

1 B

2 B

3 B

4. A

10.3928/0090-4481-19940101-03

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