Pediatric Annals

CME PRE-TEST

Abstract

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Tuberculosis once again has become an increased cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and transmission from high-risk pools of adults is occurring in increasing numbers to American children. The pediatric practitioner in both general and subspecialty practice frequently encounters clinical situations where tuberculous infection or disease must be considered and appropriate decisions made about who to evaluate, how to evaluate, and how to interpret the testing of the child or adolescent with possible tuberculous infection.

The articles in this issue of Pediatric Annals address the topics of tuberculin testing and diagnosis and management in the pediatric population as well as providing to the practitioner the current terminology and up-to-date information of current epidemiology, transmission, public health aspects, and clinical presentations of both tuberculous infection and tuberculous disease.

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category I credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRETEST

1. Virtually all cases of tuberculosis in children arise from contact with adults with active infectious disease.

A. True.

B. False.

2. A negative Mantoux tuberculin skin test result effectively rules out tuberculous infection or disease in a child.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Children younger than 10 years of age with tuberculosis are generally not considered contagious.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Twice-weekly antituberculous medication, after 1 month of daily therapy, is adequate treatment for most cases of childhood tuberculosis.

A. True.

B. False.

Answers to the Pretest:

1.A

2.B

3.A

4.A…

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Tuberculosis once again has become an increased cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and transmission from high-risk pools of adults is occurring in increasing numbers to American children. The pediatric practitioner in both general and subspecialty practice frequently encounters clinical situations where tuberculous infection or disease must be considered and appropriate decisions made about who to evaluate, how to evaluate, and how to interpret the testing of the child or adolescent with possible tuberculous infection.

The articles in this issue of Pediatric Annals address the topics of tuberculin testing and diagnosis and management in the pediatric population as well as providing to the practitioner the current terminology and up-to-date information of current epidemiology, transmission, public health aspects, and clinical presentations of both tuberculous infection and tuberculous disease.

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category I credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pretest below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRETEST

1. Virtually all cases of tuberculosis in children arise from contact with adults with active infectious disease.

A. True.

B. False.

2. A negative Mantoux tuberculin skin test result effectively rules out tuberculous infection or disease in a child.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Children younger than 10 years of age with tuberculosis are generally not considered contagious.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Twice-weekly antituberculous medication, after 1 month of daily therapy, is adequate treatment for most cases of childhood tuberculosis.

A. True.

B. False.

Answers to the Pretest:

1.A

2.B

3.A

4.A

10.3928/0090-4481-19931001-01

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