Pediatric Annals

Pediatric Asthma and Allergy Update: 1992

Jacob Hen, JR, MD

Abstract

This September 1992 issue of Pediatrie Annals marks the third issue in the past 6 years devoted to pediatrie asthma and allergy. Similar to what was done for the December 1989 issue of Pediatrie Armais, we have reprinted a few key articles from The American Journal of Asthma a? Allergy for Pediatricians from the past year for this issue. The idea for The American Journal of Asthma & AUergy for Pediatricians came from you, the readers of Pediatrie Annaís, after the February 1986 issue on Pediatrie Asthma. Now entering its fifth year of publication, The American Journal of Asthma & AUergy for Pediatricians exists for you, the primary care pediatrician, to update you in the areas of pediatrie asthma and allergy.

I know of no area of pediatrie practice with more varied management than pediatrie asthma. The first article in this issue contains the pediatrie portion of the National Institutes of Health, National Asthma Education Program's Executive Summary: Guideîmes for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma that were published last year by an NlH expert panel. Whether or not you believe in epinephrine, theophylline, steroids, betaz agonists, and home peak flow monitoring, these guidelines serve as a "standard of care" for the diagnosis and treatment of all 3.5 million children in the United States with asthma. If you follow these guidelines, not only will you start to make a dent in the high morbidity and mortality of childhood asthma, you may find asthma care fun and rewarding as well. I have no doubt that a pediatrie practice that provides "state-of-the-art" asthma care including patient/ parent education will attract new patients.

Peter König from the University of Missouri Health Sciences Center helps us sort out the pharmacologic management of asthma to complement the NIH Guidelines with "A Step-Wise Approach to the Changing Drug Therapy of Asthma."

You and the parents are often left to deal with the school system when a child has asthma and/or allergies. Warren Richards from Children's Hospital of Los Angeles provides us with a well-written guide for physicians, parents, and school teachers, administrators, and physical education instructors in his article, "Asthma, Allergies, and School."

On the home front, how many times haw you tried to get parents to stop smoking in the house or stop altogether? They all tell me they "smoke outside!" Esther L. Moe and Michael A. Wall from the Oregon Health Sciences University provide a nice review on "Smoking Cessation for Parents of Children With Asthma."

While not common, you may be called by the emergency department that a patient of yours has come in with an anaphylactic reaction. John A. Saryan and John M. O'Loughlin from the Lahey Clinic Medical Center have written a complete review on "Anaphylaxis in Children."

The American Journal of Asthma & Allergy for ffediutricians is a peer-reviewed clinical journal intended to improve clinical expertise and knowledge in pediatrie asthma and allergy. As such, we are interested in hearing from you. We are currently soliciting for general review articles and case reports for future issues.…

This September 1992 issue of Pediatrie Annals marks the third issue in the past 6 years devoted to pediatrie asthma and allergy. Similar to what was done for the December 1989 issue of Pediatrie Armais, we have reprinted a few key articles from The American Journal of Asthma a? Allergy for Pediatricians from the past year for this issue. The idea for The American Journal of Asthma & AUergy for Pediatricians came from you, the readers of Pediatrie Annaís, after the February 1986 issue on Pediatrie Asthma. Now entering its fifth year of publication, The American Journal of Asthma & AUergy for Pediatricians exists for you, the primary care pediatrician, to update you in the areas of pediatrie asthma and allergy.

I know of no area of pediatrie practice with more varied management than pediatrie asthma. The first article in this issue contains the pediatrie portion of the National Institutes of Health, National Asthma Education Program's Executive Summary: Guideîmes for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma that were published last year by an NlH expert panel. Whether or not you believe in epinephrine, theophylline, steroids, betaz agonists, and home peak flow monitoring, these guidelines serve as a "standard of care" for the diagnosis and treatment of all 3.5 million children in the United States with asthma. If you follow these guidelines, not only will you start to make a dent in the high morbidity and mortality of childhood asthma, you may find asthma care fun and rewarding as well. I have no doubt that a pediatrie practice that provides "state-of-the-art" asthma care including patient/ parent education will attract new patients.

Peter König from the University of Missouri Health Sciences Center helps us sort out the pharmacologic management of asthma to complement the NIH Guidelines with "A Step-Wise Approach to the Changing Drug Therapy of Asthma."

You and the parents are often left to deal with the school system when a child has asthma and/or allergies. Warren Richards from Children's Hospital of Los Angeles provides us with a well-written guide for physicians, parents, and school teachers, administrators, and physical education instructors in his article, "Asthma, Allergies, and School."

On the home front, how many times haw you tried to get parents to stop smoking in the house or stop altogether? They all tell me they "smoke outside!" Esther L. Moe and Michael A. Wall from the Oregon Health Sciences University provide a nice review on "Smoking Cessation for Parents of Children With Asthma."

While not common, you may be called by the emergency department that a patient of yours has come in with an anaphylactic reaction. John A. Saryan and John M. O'Loughlin from the Lahey Clinic Medical Center have written a complete review on "Anaphylaxis in Children."

The American Journal of Asthma & Allergy for ffediutricians is a peer-reviewed clinical journal intended to improve clinical expertise and knowledge in pediatrie asthma and allergy. As such, we are interested in hearing from you. We are currently soliciting for general review articles and case reports for future issues.

10.3928/0090-4481-19920901-05

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