Pediatric Annals

CME QUIZ

Abstract

INSTRUCTIONS

Pediatricians may receive three credit hours in Category 1 for the Physician's Recognition Awaro of the American Medical Association by reading the material in this issue and successfully answering the questions in the quiz below. To obtain credits, follow these instructions.

1. Read each of the articles carefully. Do not neglect the tables and other illustrative materials, as they have been selected to enhance your knowledge and understanding.

2. The following questions have been designed to provide a useful link between the articles in the Issue and your everyday practice, Read each question, choose the correct answer, and record your answer on the CME Registration Form at the end of the quiz. Retain a copy of your answers so that they can be compared with the correct answers that will be sent to you later.

3. Type or print your full name and address and your Social Security number in the spaces provided on the CME Registration Form.

4. Send the completed form, with your check or money order for S 1 8 made out to PEDIATRIC ANNALS CME CENTER, 6900 Grove Road, Thorofare, NJ 08086.

5. Your answers will be graded, and you will be advised that you have passed (or failed). An answer sheet containing all correct answers will be mailed to you. Review the parts of the articles dealing with any questions you have missed, and read the supplemental material on this aspect of the subject listed in the references in this issue.

6. Be sure to mail the form on or before the deadline listed on the CME Registration Form so that credit can be awarded. [After that date, the quiz will close, and correct answers will appear in the magazine.) Unanswered questions will be considered incorrect and so scored. A minimum score of 70 must be obtained in order for credits to be awarded.

CERTIFYING INSTTTUTION

As an organization accredited for continuing medical education, the Lenox Hill Hospital of New York designates this continuing medical education activity as meeting the criteria for three credit hours in Category I for Educational Materials for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association, provided it has been completed according to instructions.

CME Quiz

Injury Control

1 . The single leading cause of Injury death for children under age 5 is now:

A. Motor vehicle accidents.

B. Burns.

C. Drowning.

D. Pedestrian accidents.

2. All of the following statements about accident prevention interventions are true except:

A. Giving advice that is specific is likely to be far more effective than advice that is generalized and diffuse.

B. Active strategies based solely on encouraging behavior changes on the part of parents are likely to be more effective than passive strategies that work automatically.

C. Smoke detectors and fire-safe cigarettes will prevent more residential fire deaths than continued intensified messages not to smoke in bed.

D. Air bags will protect more people in automobile accidents than seat belts because they do not require a positive preventive interaction every time someone enters the automobile.

3. The risk of swimming pool drownlngs to preschoolers is:

A. Increased with the length of time the pool is owned.

B. Greatest for 4 to 5 year olds.

C. Relatively uncommon.

D. Not decreased by using solar pool blankets.

4. The least effective method to decrease pool drownings among preschoolers is to:

A. Encourage parents to supervise their children more carefully.

B. Completely fence the pool.

C. Incorporate self-latching gates into the pool fencing.

D. Make CPR certification mandatory for adults and households with pools.

5. Following a water Immersion event, consciousness is usually lost…

INSTRUCTIONS

Pediatricians may receive three credit hours in Category 1 for the Physician's Recognition Awaro of the American Medical Association by reading the material in this issue and successfully answering the questions in the quiz below. To obtain credits, follow these instructions.

1. Read each of the articles carefully. Do not neglect the tables and other illustrative materials, as they have been selected to enhance your knowledge and understanding.

2. The following questions have been designed to provide a useful link between the articles in the Issue and your everyday practice, Read each question, choose the correct answer, and record your answer on the CME Registration Form at the end of the quiz. Retain a copy of your answers so that they can be compared with the correct answers that will be sent to you later.

3. Type or print your full name and address and your Social Security number in the spaces provided on the CME Registration Form.

4. Send the completed form, with your check or money order for S 1 8 made out to PEDIATRIC ANNALS CME CENTER, 6900 Grove Road, Thorofare, NJ 08086.

5. Your answers will be graded, and you will be advised that you have passed (or failed). An answer sheet containing all correct answers will be mailed to you. Review the parts of the articles dealing with any questions you have missed, and read the supplemental material on this aspect of the subject listed in the references in this issue.

6. Be sure to mail the form on or before the deadline listed on the CME Registration Form so that credit can be awarded. [After that date, the quiz will close, and correct answers will appear in the magazine.) Unanswered questions will be considered incorrect and so scored. A minimum score of 70 must be obtained in order for credits to be awarded.

CERTIFYING INSTTTUTION

As an organization accredited for continuing medical education, the Lenox Hill Hospital of New York designates this continuing medical education activity as meeting the criteria for three credit hours in Category I for Educational Materials for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association, provided it has been completed according to instructions.

CME Quiz

Injury Control

1 . The single leading cause of Injury death for children under age 5 is now:

A. Motor vehicle accidents.

B. Burns.

C. Drowning.

D. Pedestrian accidents.

2. All of the following statements about accident prevention interventions are true except:

A. Giving advice that is specific is likely to be far more effective than advice that is generalized and diffuse.

B. Active strategies based solely on encouraging behavior changes on the part of parents are likely to be more effective than passive strategies that work automatically.

C. Smoke detectors and fire-safe cigarettes will prevent more residential fire deaths than continued intensified messages not to smoke in bed.

D. Air bags will protect more people in automobile accidents than seat belts because they do not require a positive preventive interaction every time someone enters the automobile.

3. The risk of swimming pool drownlngs to preschoolers is:

A. Increased with the length of time the pool is owned.

B. Greatest for 4 to 5 year olds.

C. Relatively uncommon.

D. Not decreased by using solar pool blankets.

4. The least effective method to decrease pool drownings among preschoolers is to:

A. Encourage parents to supervise their children more carefully.

B. Completely fence the pool.

C. Incorporate self-latching gates into the pool fencing.

D. Make CPR certification mandatory for adults and households with pools.

5. Following a water Immersion event, consciousness is usually lost after about 2 minutes of anoxia, and irreversible brain damage begins after only an additional 2 to 4 minutes.

A. True.

B. False.

6. All of the following statements about burns in childhood are true except:

A. House fire deaths have increased over the last 1 5 years.

B. Scalds are the most common burns to children under the age of 5 that require hospital ization.

C. The majority of scald burns involve foods and beverages.

D. Matches are the most common known ignition source for burns in children.

7. Appropriate accident prevention strategies for pediatricians to use Include counseling on all of the following except:

A. Reduce hot water heater settings to 125° F.

B. Install smoke detectors.

C. Have parents closely supervise their children.

D. Counsel parents against the use of baby walkers.

8. The most common ignition source of fata/ ffres In the United States is:

A. Electricity.

B. Matches.

C. Gasoline.

D. Cigarettes.

9. Firearm fatalities among teenagers would likely be decreased by all of the following strategies except:

A. Regulation of bullet design.

B. Decreasing access to handguns.

C. Trigger locks.

D. Storing weapons unlocked.

10. Of the following commonly held beliefs, the only true one Is that:

A. Gun control is unconstitutional.

B. Weapon design changes will do little to decrease fatalities in the short term.

C. Handguns protect families from intruders.

D. Laws do not do anything to decrease gun fatalities.

11. In all circumstances of firearms death and injury, the most Important risk factor Involved Is:

A. The cost of the firearms.

B. The type and ease of firearm use.

C. The accessibility of the firearms.

D. The number of smokers and substance abusers in the household.

12. True statements about firearms fatalities Include all of the following except:

A. There was a 25% increase in the number of firearm deaths from all sources in the years 1985 to 1988.

B. The number of firearm homicides in 14 other developed countries of the world combined is about 25% that of such deaths in the United States.

C. Homicide is the leading cause of death in young adult males in the United States.

D, Firearm deaths become substantial in early adolescence, and peak in early adult life.

13. All of the following goaloriented treatment strategies are part of rehabilitation following injury except:

A. Enhancement of systems unaffected by the pathological process.

B. Enhancement of the functional capacity of the child.

C. Return to the same social and educational environment regardless of the injury.

D. Use of adaptive equipment and aids to promote function.

14. All of the following may frequently be seen following acute traumatic brain injury except:

A. Persistent neurological deficits.

B. Late post-traumatic seizures.

C. Affective and attention deficit disorders.

D. Decrease in performance IQ.

15. The most common diagnosis following trauma among seriously injured children Is:

A. Traumatic brain injury.

B. Traumatic lung injury.

C. Traumatic abdominal injury.

D. Traumatic spinal injury.

16. Of the following, which has no correlation with outcome from spinal cord Injury?

A. Incomplete injury.

B. Injuries to the cauda equina.

C. Late treatment with steroids.

D. Inability to move against gravity.

17. Of the following, the most important known risk factor for adolescent suicide is:

A. Prior attempt.

B. Mental illness.

C. Substance abuse.

D. Family history of suicide.

18. All of the following have been shown to be risk factors for adolescent suicide except:

A. Dissolution of relationships.

B. Loss of family or friend by non-suicide means.

C. Availability of guns in the community.

D. Poor performance in athletic competition.

19. In assessing risk for possible adolescent suicide, pediatricians in the office setting should do all of the following except:

A. Screen all adolescents for suicide risk using readily available standardized instruments.

B. Inquire about substance abuse.

C. Ask about past mental health problems.

D. Inquire about access to guns at home.

20. Proven community interventions for the prevention of adolescent suicide include:

A. Maintaining school-based curricula on suicide prevention.

B. Utilizing screening questionnaires to identify high-risk youth.

C. Establishing crisis centers and hotlines.

D. Decreasing availability and access to firearms.

Answers to the April Quiz Prevention of Heart Disease

1. A

2. B

3. D

4. C

5. A

6. D

7. C

8. D

9. B

10. D

11. A

12. B

13. C

14. C

15. B

16. A

17. D

18. C

19. D

20. B

10.3928/0090-4481-19920701-11

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