Pediatric Annals

CME PRE-TEST

Abstract

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Most pediatric practitioners are involved daily with one or more aspects of sports medicine - in preparticipation evaluations, In diagnosing and managing acute sports injuries, and in counsefing patients about the risk/benefits of individual athletic activities or of sports in general.

The anides in this issue of Pediatric Annals are of particular importance in providing practitioners with the current information and guidelines in those areas, plus updating the practitioner about both the use and abuse of steroids in adolescents and teenagers, and about the risk factors and etiology of sudden, unexpected death in the young athlete.

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category I credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pre-Test below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRE-TEST

1. At the high school and collegiate levels, football has the highest sports injury rate, followed by wrestling and gymnastics.

A. True.

B. False.

2. Accepted components of first aid following a sports injury include all of the following except:

A. Compression.

B. Elevation.

C. Cryotherapy.

D. Anti-inflammatory medication.

3. The largest number of significant eye injuries in the 5 to 14 age group occurs with athletic participation in:

A. Football.

B. Basketball.

C. Baseball.

D. Tennis.

4. A standard method for reporting sports injuries does not exist, making meaningful comparisons between these sports quite difficult.

A. True.

B. False.

Answers to the Pre-Test:

1.A 2.D 3.C 4.A…

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Most pediatric practitioners are involved daily with one or more aspects of sports medicine - in preparticipation evaluations, In diagnosing and managing acute sports injuries, and in counsefing patients about the risk/benefits of individual athletic activities or of sports in general.

The anides in this issue of Pediatric Annals are of particular importance in providing practitioners with the current information and guidelines in those areas, plus updating the practitioner about both the use and abuse of steroids in adolescents and teenagers, and about the risk factors and etiology of sudden, unexpected death in the young athlete.

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category I credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pre-Test below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRE-TEST

1. At the high school and collegiate levels, football has the highest sports injury rate, followed by wrestling and gymnastics.

A. True.

B. False.

2. Accepted components of first aid following a sports injury include all of the following except:

A. Compression.

B. Elevation.

C. Cryotherapy.

D. Anti-inflammatory medication.

3. The largest number of significant eye injuries in the 5 to 14 age group occurs with athletic participation in:

A. Football.

B. Basketball.

C. Baseball.

D. Tennis.

4. A standard method for reporting sports injuries does not exist, making meaningful comparisons between these sports quite difficult.

A. True.

B. False.

Answers to the Pre-Test:

1.A 2.D 3.C 4.A

10.3928/0090-4481-19920301-03

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents