Pediatric Annals

CME PRE-TEST

Abstract

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides the pediatrie practitioner with up-to-date information, understanding of etiologies, and practical clinical management outlines for several common behavioral problems seen almost daily in busy offices or outpatient clinical settings.

This issue addresses sleep learning, toilet training, primary nocturnal enuresis, attention-deficit disorders, and oppositional negative behaviors. These subjects are discussed inconcise, practical, handson articles that include information pediatricians can use to increase both their understanding of and skills in providing parents of infants and young children with competent anticipatory guidance, counseling, and advice.

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category I credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the guiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pre-Test below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRE-TEST

1. Most children have not achieved bladder and bowel control during the day by age 36 months.

A. True.

B. False.

2. Nocturnal enuresis is more common in boys than in girls.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Independent play skills are to be taught and encouraged by parents for use with their children as early as the 6- to 9-month age period.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Time spent by the average pediatrician on anticipatory guidance during a general (under age 5) well child visit usually approximates:

A. Less than 2 minutes.

B. 2 to 4 minutes.

C. 5 to 7 minutes.

D. 8 minutes or longer.

Answers to the Pre-test:

1.B 2 A 3.A 4.A…

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

This issue of Pediatrie Annals provides the pediatrie practitioner with up-to-date information, understanding of etiologies, and practical clinical management outlines for several common behavioral problems seen almost daily in busy offices or outpatient clinical settings.

This issue addresses sleep learning, toilet training, primary nocturnal enuresis, attention-deficit disorders, and oppositional negative behaviors. These subjects are discussed inconcise, practical, handson articles that include information pediatricians can use to increase both their understanding of and skills in providing parents of infants and young children with competent anticipatory guidance, counseling, and advice.

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category I credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the guiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pre-Test below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRE-TEST

1. Most children have not achieved bladder and bowel control during the day by age 36 months.

A. True.

B. False.

2. Nocturnal enuresis is more common in boys than in girls.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Independent play skills are to be taught and encouraged by parents for use with their children as early as the 6- to 9-month age period.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Time spent by the average pediatrician on anticipatory guidance during a general (under age 5) well child visit usually approximates:

A. Less than 2 minutes.

B. 2 to 4 minutes.

C. 5 to 7 minutes.

D. 8 minutes or longer.

Answers to the Pre-test:

1.B 2 A 3.A 4.A

10.3928/0090-4481-19910501-03

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