Pediatric Annals

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Correction

Abstract

In the November 1991 issue of Pediatrie Annals, the Figure accompanying Dr Hoekelman's editorial, "A Pediatrician's View: Do You Do Tympanocenteses?" was printed backwards. The Figure is reproduced correctly below.…

In the November 1991 issue of Pediatrie Annals, the Figure accompanying Dr Hoekelman's editorial, "A Pediatrician's View: Do You Do Tympanocenteses?" was printed backwards. The Figure is reproduced correctly below.

Figure. Tympanocentesis. A) A 3-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle that has been shaped to allow direct visualization of the tympanic membrane through the operating otoscope. A tuberculin syringe barrel is attached to the needle, and tubing is attached to the syringe barrel. B) The preferred site on the right tympanic membrane for puncture and aspiration of the middle ear. Once the middle ear has been entered, the operator applies negative pressure through the end of the tubing, as illustrated. Reprinted with permission from Custer JR. Special procedures. In: Hoekelman RA, Friedman SB, Nelson NM, Seidel HM, eds. Primary Pediatric Care. 2nd ed. © 1991, Mosby Yearbook.

Figure. Tympanocentesis. A) A 3-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle that has been shaped to allow direct visualization of the tympanic membrane through the operating otoscope. A tuberculin syringe barrel is attached to the needle, and tubing is attached to the syringe barrel. B) The preferred site on the right tympanic membrane for puncture and aspiration of the middle ear. Once the middle ear has been entered, the operator applies negative pressure through the end of the tubing, as illustrated. Reprinted with permission from Custer JR. Special procedures. In: Hoekelman RA, Friedman SB, Nelson NM, Seidel HM, eds. Primary Pediatric Care. 2nd ed. © 1991, Mosby Yearbook.

10.3928/0090-4481-19911201-03

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