Pediatric Annals

CME QUIZ

Abstract

INSTRUCTIONS

Pediatricians may receive three credit hours in Category I for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the material in this issue and successfully answering the questions in the quiz below. To obtain credits, follow these instructions.

1. Read each off the articles carefully. Oo not neglect the tables and other illustrative materials, as they have been selected to enhance your know/edge and understanding.

2. The following questions have been designed to provide a useful link between the articles in the issue and your everyday practice. Read each question, choose the correct answer, and record your answer on the CME Registration Form at the end of the quiz. Retain a copy of your answers so that they can be compared with the correct answers that will be sent to you later.

3. Type or print your full name and address and your Socia/ Security number in the spaces provided on the CME Registration Form.

4. Send the completed form, with your check or money order for Sl 5 made out to PEDIATRIC ANNALS CME CENTER. 6900 Grove Road, Thorofare, NJ. 08086.

5. Your answers will be graded, and you will be advised that you have passed (or failed). An answer sheet containing all correct answers will be mailed to you. Review the parts of the articles dealing with any questions you have missed, and read the supplemental material on this aspect of the subject listed in the references in this issue.

6. Be sure to mall the form on or before the deadline listed on the CME Registration Form, so that credit can be awarded. (After that date, the quiz will close, and correct answers will appear in the magazine.) Unanswered questions will be considered incorrect and so scored. A minimum score of 70 must be obtained in order for credits to be awarded.

CERTIFYING INSTITUTION

As an organization accredited for continuing medical education, the Lexon Hill Hospital of New York designares fhís continuing medical education activity as meeting the criteria for three credit hours in Category 1 for Educational Materials for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association, provided it has been completed according to instructions.

CME Quiz

Ethical Issues In Pediatric Practice

1. The postconventional stage of moral reasoning:

A. Is characterized by a strong impulse toward autonomous moral principles.

B. Is fully developed during early adolescence.

C. Is clearly dependent on the expectations and rules of the family, group, or nation.

D. Precedes the development of formal operational reasoning.

2. The mature minor doctrine:

A. Does not extend to mature adolescents the legal rights described in regulations dealing with contraception for adults.

B. Does not grant an adolescent the right to refusal if her parents insist on a termination of her pregnancy.

C. Represents societal recognition of the adolescent's increasing maturity and autonomy.

D. Was made obsolete by the 1979 Supreme Court ruling [BeIIoW v Bairû) against a Massachusetts law requiring parental consent for the abortion of an unmarried minor.

3. The personhood status of the fetus has been consldeed to have:

A. Full moral claim; abortion is the equivalent of infanticide.

B. No moral claim; abortion is equivalent to elective surgery (tissue removal).

C. Moral claims but they are not absolute; abortion is equivalent to selfdefense.

D. All of the above.

4. To be effective in counseling pregnant teenagers, pediatricians should:

A. Ignore their own personal reactions and feelings toward the patient and abortion.

B. Familiarize themselves with the stages of adolescent moral development.

C. Avoid the area of ethical reasoning.

D. All of the above.

5. The ethical…

INSTRUCTIONS

Pediatricians may receive three credit hours in Category I for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the material in this issue and successfully answering the questions in the quiz below. To obtain credits, follow these instructions.

1. Read each off the articles carefully. Oo not neglect the tables and other illustrative materials, as they have been selected to enhance your know/edge and understanding.

2. The following questions have been designed to provide a useful link between the articles in the issue and your everyday practice. Read each question, choose the correct answer, and record your answer on the CME Registration Form at the end of the quiz. Retain a copy of your answers so that they can be compared with the correct answers that will be sent to you later.

3. Type or print your full name and address and your Socia/ Security number in the spaces provided on the CME Registration Form.

4. Send the completed form, with your check or money order for Sl 5 made out to PEDIATRIC ANNALS CME CENTER. 6900 Grove Road, Thorofare, NJ. 08086.

5. Your answers will be graded, and you will be advised that you have passed (or failed). An answer sheet containing all correct answers will be mailed to you. Review the parts of the articles dealing with any questions you have missed, and read the supplemental material on this aspect of the subject listed in the references in this issue.

6. Be sure to mall the form on or before the deadline listed on the CME Registration Form, so that credit can be awarded. (After that date, the quiz will close, and correct answers will appear in the magazine.) Unanswered questions will be considered incorrect and so scored. A minimum score of 70 must be obtained in order for credits to be awarded.

CERTIFYING INSTITUTION

As an organization accredited for continuing medical education, the Lexon Hill Hospital of New York designares fhís continuing medical education activity as meeting the criteria for three credit hours in Category 1 for Educational Materials for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association, provided it has been completed according to instructions.

CME Quiz

Ethical Issues In Pediatric Practice

1. The postconventional stage of moral reasoning:

A. Is characterized by a strong impulse toward autonomous moral principles.

B. Is fully developed during early adolescence.

C. Is clearly dependent on the expectations and rules of the family, group, or nation.

D. Precedes the development of formal operational reasoning.

2. The mature minor doctrine:

A. Does not extend to mature adolescents the legal rights described in regulations dealing with contraception for adults.

B. Does not grant an adolescent the right to refusal if her parents insist on a termination of her pregnancy.

C. Represents societal recognition of the adolescent's increasing maturity and autonomy.

D. Was made obsolete by the 1979 Supreme Court ruling [BeIIoW v Bairû) against a Massachusetts law requiring parental consent for the abortion of an unmarried minor.

3. The personhood status of the fetus has been consldeed to have:

A. Full moral claim; abortion is the equivalent of infanticide.

B. No moral claim; abortion is equivalent to elective surgery (tissue removal).

C. Moral claims but they are not absolute; abortion is equivalent to selfdefense.

D. All of the above.

4. To be effective in counseling pregnant teenagers, pediatricians should:

A. Ignore their own personal reactions and feelings toward the patient and abortion.

B. Familiarize themselves with the stages of adolescent moral development.

C. Avoid the area of ethical reasoning.

D. All of the above.

5. The ethical dilemma posed by abortion in adolescence:

A. Requires an analysis that includes a developmental perspective.

B. Exists in the context of a larger struggle in moral philosophy.

C. Illustrates how moral issues dealing with teenage coducts highlight the confusion inherent to pluralism.

D. All of the above.

6. Which of the following statements Is false about state laws relative to adoptees' birth records:

A. All states prohibit adoptees from having direct access to their birth records.

B. Adoptees generally can obtain information from their adoptive records by only petitioning the courts.

C. Petitioning the courts is a good way for adoptees to discover the name of their birth parent.

D. Petitioning the courts is a good way for adoptees to obtain important health information.

7. Which of the following events Is not a common precipitant of an adoptees' search for the birth parent:

A. High school graduation.

B. Marriage.

C. Pregnancy.

D. Birth of a child.

8. The reasons most searching adult adoptees want more information about their pasts include all of the following except:

A. They want to establish a complete identify

B. They felt they had a right to know of their origins.

C. They wished to heai the wounds of abandonment.

D. They felt a void in their lives needed to be filled.

9. Informed consent, to be valid, must satisfy the following condition(s):

A. The patient must be mentally competent.

B. The patient must be adequately informed about the proposed treatment.

C. The patients decision must be made freely

D. All of the above.

10. The decision making capacity (competence) of children requires:

A. Possession of a set of values and goals.

B. The ability to communicate information.

C. The ability to reason about one's choice.

D. All of the above.

11. How many pediatric patients receive suboptimal care as a result of parental noncompliance or treatment refusal:

A. Less than 10%.

B. 10% to 50%.

C. 50% to 75%.

D. Nearly all.

12. Which of the following factors do courts not consider in deciding whether to order treatment over parental objection:

A. The severity of outcome without treatment.

B. The quality of the patient's life.

C. The severity of the side-effects of treatment.

D. Whether there is conflicting advice from doctors.

13. Which of the following Is false? From an ethical point of view, consent of a child or adolescent for a proposed treatment:

A. Requires the child or adolescent to be aware of the nature of the illness.

B. Requires the disclosure to the child or adolescent of the nature of the proposed treatment.

C. Does not require the child's or adolescent's willingness to undergo a particular treatment.

D. Requires the child's or adolescent's willingness to undergo a particular treatment.

14. If a child refuses to assent to a proposed treatment, the pediatrician should:

A. Abandon the proposed treatment.

B. Temporarily delay intervention.

C. Force the child to undergo the treatment.

D. Obtain another opinion of the proposed treatment.

15. A pediatrician's disclosure of information to parents should be:

A. What the pediatrician thinks the parent wants to hear.

B. The pediatrician's personal beliefs and practices about raising children.

C. Complete and comprehensible information after listening to the parents questions and concerns.

D. According to the parent's income level.

16. If a pediatrician adheres to the beneficence model as described by Beauchamp and McCullough, a decision whether or not to give an antibiotic should be based:

A. Solely on medical indication.

B. On the parent's demands.

C. On whether the parents can afford the antibiotic.

D. On medical indications and contraindications, but the pediatrician should hear the parent's views before making a final decision.

17. All of the following are duties of health care providers in our system except a duty to:

A. A level of skill.

B. Make that skill maximally available to the patient.

C. Act as the society's advocate.

D. Act as the patient's advocate.

18. In what morally relevant sense are children more vulnerable than most adult patients when they are III:

A. They are less intelligent.

B. They are not as tall.

C. They cannot retain legal counsel.

D. They lack social and political power.

19. The vulnerability of children is unique because it can be characterized as inherently:

A. Receding.

B. Increasing.

C. Unstable.

D. Deceptive.

20. The pediatrician can be regarded as playing what role concerning the child:

A. Trustee.

B. Custodian.

C. Associate.

D. Colleague.

ANSWERS TO THE JANUARY QUIZ

1. D

2. B

3. C

4. A

5. A

6. C

7. A

8. C

9. D

10. A

11. D

12. A

13. D

14. D

15. C

16. D

17. C

18. C

19. D

20. B

10.3928/0090-4481-19890401-12

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