Pediatric Annals

CME PRE-TEST

Abstract

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVE

The pediatrician is the first to make a diagnosis before referring a patient to a pediatric surgeon for specialized care. Therefore, the pediatrician must be aware of the latest diagnostic and treatment methods. This issue of Pediatric Annals discusses the most frequently encountered surgical problems in pediatric care. Topics include: the acute scrotum and abdomen, gastroesophageal reffux, circumcision, inguinal and scrotal problems, chest wall deformities, and neck masses in infants and children.

HOW TO OBTAIN CIME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pre-Test below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered, and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRE-TEST

1. Breathing exercises and weight lifting can decrease the pectus excavatum deformity.

A. True.

B. False.

2. The etiology of pectus carinatum Is probably the same as that of pectus excavatum.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Change in appearance of a hemangioma from fiery red to grey In color is a sign of degeneration and should lead to surgical referral for excision.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Branchial arch remnants frequently become Infected unless excised early In infancy.

A. True.

B. False.…

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVE

The pediatrician is the first to make a diagnosis before referring a patient to a pediatric surgeon for specialized care. Therefore, the pediatrician must be aware of the latest diagnostic and treatment methods. This issue of Pediatric Annals discusses the most frequently encountered surgical problems in pediatric care. Topics include: the acute scrotum and abdomen, gastroesophageal reffux, circumcision, inguinal and scrotal problems, chest wall deformities, and neck masses in infants and children.

HOW TO OBTAIN CIME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the following articles and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages.

The Pre-Test below has been prepared to assist you in studying the following material. It indicates some of the areas to be covered, and will make it possible for you to challenge your present knowledge of the material before reading further.

PRE-TEST

1. Breathing exercises and weight lifting can decrease the pectus excavatum deformity.

A. True.

B. False.

2. The etiology of pectus carinatum Is probably the same as that of pectus excavatum.

A. True.

B. False.

3. Change in appearance of a hemangioma from fiery red to grey In color is a sign of degeneration and should lead to surgical referral for excision.

A. True.

B. False.

4. Branchial arch remnants frequently become Infected unless excised early In infancy.

A. True.

B. False.

10.3928/0090-4481-19890301-03

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