Pediatric Annals

CME QUIZ

Abstract

INSTRUCTIONS

Pediatricians may receive three credit hours in Category I for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the material in this issue and successfully answering the questions in the quiz below. To obtain credits, follow these instructions.

1. Read each of the articles carefully. Oo not neglect the tables and other illustrative materials, as they have been selected to enhance your knowledge and understanding.

2. The following questions have been designed to provide a useful link between the articles in the issue and your everyday practice. Read each question, choose the correct answer, and record your answer on the CME Registration Form at the end of the quiz. Retain a copy of your answers so that they can be compared with the correct answers that will be sent to you later.

3. Type or print your full name and address and your Social Security number in the spaces provided on the CME Registration Form.

4. Send the completed form, with your check or money order for S 1 5 made out to PEDIATRIC ANNALS CME CENTER. 6900 Grove Road. Thorofare. NJ. 08086.

5. Your answers will be graded, and you will be advised that you have passed [or failed). An answer sheet containing all correct answers will be mailed to you. Review the parts of the articles dealing with any questions you have missed, and read the supplemental material on this aspect of the subject listed in the references in this issue.

6. Be sure to mail the form on or before the deadline listed on the CME Registration Form, so that credit can be awarded. (After that date, the quiz will close, and correct answers will appear in the magazine.) Unanswered questions will be considered incorrect and so scored. A minimum score of 70 must be obtained in order for credits to be awarded.

CERTIFYING INSTITUTION

As an organization accredited for continuing medical education, the Lexon Hill Hospital of New York designates this continuing medical education activity as meeting the criteria for three credit hours in Category 1 for Educational Materials for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association, provided it has been completed according to instructions.'

CME Quiz

Selected Issues in Pediatric Rehabilitation

1. In caring for a child with disabilities, the pediatrician:

A. Must give routine care.

B. Must recognize problems associated with the primary diagnosis.

C. Must be aware of services available in the patient's area.

D. All of the above.

2. Children are prime candidates for repeated respiratory infections if they:

A. Attend a public school.

B. Have poor nutrition.

C. Regularly go to church.

D. Belong to the local YMCA.

3. Which of the following statements is false? The handicapped child should have:

A. A detailed history of dietary intake.

B. No urinary catheterization.

C. Regulation of stool consistency by dietary measures.

D. Schooling where the teacher is familiar with the child's disability.

4. Rehabilitation of children with neuromuscular disease has changed in the past two decades because of:

A. Discovery of crucial enzymes.

B. Better understanding of the natural course of various diseases.

C. Diplomas in rehabilitation engineering.

D. All of the above.

5. The principles of rehabilitation in the disabled child should include:

A Optimal emotional development.

B. Maintenance of function whenever possible.

C. Prevention of secondary complications.

D. All of the above.

6. The most common neuromuscular disorder affecting the ambulant child is:

A. Duchenne muscular dystrophy

B. Multiple sclerosis.

C. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

D. None of the above.

7. The major developmental tasks of the adolescent child include:

A. Achieving independence from parents.

B.…

INSTRUCTIONS

Pediatricians may receive three credit hours in Category I for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the material in this issue and successfully answering the questions in the quiz below. To obtain credits, follow these instructions.

1. Read each of the articles carefully. Oo not neglect the tables and other illustrative materials, as they have been selected to enhance your knowledge and understanding.

2. The following questions have been designed to provide a useful link between the articles in the issue and your everyday practice. Read each question, choose the correct answer, and record your answer on the CME Registration Form at the end of the quiz. Retain a copy of your answers so that they can be compared with the correct answers that will be sent to you later.

3. Type or print your full name and address and your Social Security number in the spaces provided on the CME Registration Form.

4. Send the completed form, with your check or money order for S 1 5 made out to PEDIATRIC ANNALS CME CENTER. 6900 Grove Road. Thorofare. NJ. 08086.

5. Your answers will be graded, and you will be advised that you have passed [or failed). An answer sheet containing all correct answers will be mailed to you. Review the parts of the articles dealing with any questions you have missed, and read the supplemental material on this aspect of the subject listed in the references in this issue.

6. Be sure to mail the form on or before the deadline listed on the CME Registration Form, so that credit can be awarded. (After that date, the quiz will close, and correct answers will appear in the magazine.) Unanswered questions will be considered incorrect and so scored. A minimum score of 70 must be obtained in order for credits to be awarded.

CERTIFYING INSTITUTION

As an organization accredited for continuing medical education, the Lexon Hill Hospital of New York designates this continuing medical education activity as meeting the criteria for three credit hours in Category 1 for Educational Materials for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association, provided it has been completed according to instructions.'

CME Quiz

Selected Issues in Pediatric Rehabilitation

1. In caring for a child with disabilities, the pediatrician:

A. Must give routine care.

B. Must recognize problems associated with the primary diagnosis.

C. Must be aware of services available in the patient's area.

D. All of the above.

2. Children are prime candidates for repeated respiratory infections if they:

A. Attend a public school.

B. Have poor nutrition.

C. Regularly go to church.

D. Belong to the local YMCA.

3. Which of the following statements is false? The handicapped child should have:

A. A detailed history of dietary intake.

B. No urinary catheterization.

C. Regulation of stool consistency by dietary measures.

D. Schooling where the teacher is familiar with the child's disability.

4. Rehabilitation of children with neuromuscular disease has changed in the past two decades because of:

A. Discovery of crucial enzymes.

B. Better understanding of the natural course of various diseases.

C. Diplomas in rehabilitation engineering.

D. All of the above.

5. The principles of rehabilitation in the disabled child should include:

A Optimal emotional development.

B. Maintenance of function whenever possible.

C. Prevention of secondary complications.

D. All of the above.

6. The most common neuromuscular disorder affecting the ambulant child is:

A. Duchenne muscular dystrophy

B. Multiple sclerosis.

C. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

D. None of the above.

7. The major developmental tasks of the adolescent child include:

A. Achieving independence from parents.

B. Establishing new love objects outside the family

C. Finding a vocation.

D. All of the above.

8. Which of the following statements is false? Disabled individuals have a prolonged adolescence because:

A. They have to become independent.

B. Their experience with peers is limited.

C. Their identity crisis is even more profound.

D. They have become sheltered.

9. Which of the following statements is false? The disabled individual is:

A. Not acceptable to society.

B. Usually determined to do well.

C. Usually full of self-pity.

D. An individual who has also rejected himself.

10. Which of the following statements is false? The goal of neurodevelopmental therapy is to:

A. Improve balance.

B. Alter abnormal posture.

C. Try to alter muscle tone.

D. Develop fundamental movement patternmgs.

11. Electrical stimulation therapy of the disabled individual:

A. Produces an inhibition of spasticity.

B. Has also fiad good results in children with cerebral palsy

C. Has a long term carry-over.

D. Has had good patient compliance.

12. Neurosurgical treatment of the disabled child:

A. Is widely used.

B. Should be tried.

C. Is not widely accepted.

D. All of the above.

13. In the first two years of life:

A. Treatment for physical disabilities is useless.

B. Treatment for physical disabilities is delivered in the form of positioning to induce active motion on the part of the infant.

C. Assistive devices should be kept in mind for use in school years.

D. Visual and hearing deficits need no intervention until school years.

14. Preschool children develop the ability to:

A. Substitute verbal symbols for real life events.

B. Assert themselves.

C. Gain from enrollment in a preschool program.

D. All of the above.

15. Participation of the disabled child In adapted sports:

A. Should be discouraged.

B. Should be encouraged.

C. Offers no real benefits for a disabled child.

D. Frequently aggravates a bad situation.

16. During adolescence of the disabled:

A. Reliance on others may perpetuate a dependent personality

B. A majority achieve social survival skills.

C. Individual therapy rather than group counseling should be utilized.

D. Sexual dysfunction in males does not categorically exclude the potential for fathering a child.

17. Pediatricians can help children to cope more effectively by providing the family with:

A. Information.

B. Suggestions for strategies.

C. Community resources.

D. All of the above.

18. An ineffective coping behavior used by many young disabled children is: A. Being flexible.

B. Being independent.

C. Talking too much.

D. Avoidance.

19. A physician can learn how the child and family cope with the demands of the child's condition by:

A. Giving them a test.

B. Observation and interview

C. Sending them to a psychiatrist.

D. Reading a book about coping.

20. When observing parent-child interaction, it is important to note:

A. How long they talk to each other.

B. Whether one is depressed or emotionally volatile.

C. How they are dressed.

D. Who talks first.

ANSWERS TO THE SEPTEMBER QUIZ

1. C

2. C

3. D

4. B

5. D

6. B

7. B

8. A

9. C

10. B

11. C

12. D

13. C

14. B

15. A

16. A

17. D

18. B

19. C

20. D

10.3928/0090-4481-19881201-11

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