Pediatric Annals

Pediatric Otolaryngology

Herman Felder, MD, FACS, FAAP

Abstract

I was last privileged to be guest editor of an otolaryngology issue of Pediatric Annah 12 years ago.1 Since that time, the field of pediatric otolaryngology has changed tremendously. In those days, there was no such specialty; there were just a handful of us who worked in children's hospitals. Pediatric otolaryngology is now not only a recognized subspecialty of otolaryngology, but we also have our own society: The American Academy of Pediatric Otolaryngology (ASPO). The society is composed of more than 100 members, many of whom are young graduates of fellowship programs and directors of pediatric otolaryngology at children's hospitals throughout the United States. Most are also fellows of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The type of work we are doing has also changed. The lead article 12 years ago was about chronic ear disease.2 The number of these operations has markedly decreased mainly due to the increase in the use of tympanostomy tubes. The advent of pediatric-sized fiberoptics and telescopes has increased our expertise in diagnosis and facilitated the removal of foreign bodies in the air and food passages of children. The use of CAT scanners and NMRs has helped to increase the scope of head and neck surgery (laryngeal, tracheal, skull base) to a degree never thought possible 12 years ago. The increase in the number of immunosuppressed children has given us more serious head and neck infections that require consultations with our pediatric infectious disease colleagues.

I am again privileged to be a guest editor, and I can't help but wonder what the next 12 years will bring.

1. Pediatric Annals 1976; 5(8).

2. Felder H: Chronic otitis media in children. Pedíame Annals 1976; 5(817-14.…

I was last privileged to be guest editor of an otolaryngology issue of Pediatric Annah 12 years ago.1 Since that time, the field of pediatric otolaryngology has changed tremendously. In those days, there was no such specialty; there were just a handful of us who worked in children's hospitals. Pediatric otolaryngology is now not only a recognized subspecialty of otolaryngology, but we also have our own society: The American Academy of Pediatric Otolaryngology (ASPO). The society is composed of more than 100 members, many of whom are young graduates of fellowship programs and directors of pediatric otolaryngology at children's hospitals throughout the United States. Most are also fellows of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The type of work we are doing has also changed. The lead article 12 years ago was about chronic ear disease.2 The number of these operations has markedly decreased mainly due to the increase in the use of tympanostomy tubes. The advent of pediatric-sized fiberoptics and telescopes has increased our expertise in diagnosis and facilitated the removal of foreign bodies in the air and food passages of children. The use of CAT scanners and NMRs has helped to increase the scope of head and neck surgery (laryngeal, tracheal, skull base) to a degree never thought possible 12 years ago. The increase in the number of immunosuppressed children has given us more serious head and neck infections that require consultations with our pediatric infectious disease colleagues.

I am again privileged to be a guest editor, and I can't help but wonder what the next 12 years will bring.

REFERENCES

1. Pediatric Annals 1976; 5(8).

2. Felder H: Chronic otitis media in children. Pedíame Annals 1976; 5(817-14.

10.3928/0090-4481-19881001-05

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