Pediatric Annals

BOOK REVIEWS 

THE SKIN AND SYSTEMIC DISEASE IN CHILDREN

Heinz F Eichenwald, MD

Abstract

Sidney Hurwitz THE SKIN AND SYSTEMIC DISEASE IN CHILDREN Chicago: Year Book Medical Publisher, 1985, 400 pages

The ability to identify or suspect a systemic disease on the basis of its cutaneous manifestations represents an important aspect of clinical diagnosis. With many infections, such as varicella, recognition and diagnosis is relatively easy but a sizable number of unusual conditions can be recognized by the presence of specific skin changes such as erythema chronicum migrans with Lyme disease and the appearance of irregular, nodular, red, tender nodules or plaques on the fece, neck and limbs in Sweets syndrome.

Such information is assembled by Dr. Hurwitz in a small book. The material is presented in an exemplary and organized fashion, listing the various disease states and the rashes or other skin manifestations associated with them. Especially useful are the tables which present the essential diagnostic and histopathologic features for each condition so that the reader can clearly recognize whether a specific patient is likely to be suffering from a particular disease or not. A sufficient number of illustrations is included so that the clinical appearance of a rash can be compared to a "standard." However, unlike many dermatology books, this one consists primarily of text, not pictures.

I have had the volume on my desk for the past month and find that I refer to it frequently; it has proven very helpful in efforts to diagnose some more or less obscure illnesses that present with various skin manifestations. This is not a text that one keeps on the shelf, but is one that will be used frequently in clinical practice.…

Sidney Hurwitz THE SKIN AND SYSTEMIC DISEASE IN CHILDREN Chicago: Year Book Medical Publisher, 1985, 400 pages

The ability to identify or suspect a systemic disease on the basis of its cutaneous manifestations represents an important aspect of clinical diagnosis. With many infections, such as varicella, recognition and diagnosis is relatively easy but a sizable number of unusual conditions can be recognized by the presence of specific skin changes such as erythema chronicum migrans with Lyme disease and the appearance of irregular, nodular, red, tender nodules or plaques on the fece, neck and limbs in Sweets syndrome.

Such information is assembled by Dr. Hurwitz in a small book. The material is presented in an exemplary and organized fashion, listing the various disease states and the rashes or other skin manifestations associated with them. Especially useful are the tables which present the essential diagnostic and histopathologic features for each condition so that the reader can clearly recognize whether a specific patient is likely to be suffering from a particular disease or not. A sufficient number of illustrations is included so that the clinical appearance of a rash can be compared to a "standard." However, unlike many dermatology books, this one consists primarily of text, not pictures.

I have had the volume on my desk for the past month and find that I refer to it frequently; it has proven very helpful in efforts to diagnose some more or less obscure illnesses that present with various skin manifestations. This is not a text that one keeps on the shelf, but is one that will be used frequently in clinical practice.

10.3928/0090-4481-19860201-13

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