Pediatric Annals

BOOK REVIEWS 

CLINICAL SIMULATIONS IN NEONATAL RESPIRATORY THERAPY

Hugh E Evans, MD

Abstract

Robert W. Hirnle

CLINICAL SIMULATIONS IN NEONATAL RESPIRATORY THERAPY

New York, John Wiley & Sons Inc., 1982, 316 pp.

This is a problem oriented programmed text for health professionals, respiratory therapists and nurses. The first part is a self-instructional approach to fetal-neonatal cardiopulmonary development and the second consists of six problem sets simulating clinical conditions in neonates.

The material covered in part 1 is elementary and deals with embryology and physiology. It does not correlate with the clinical scenarios presented in part 2, The latter are realistic commonplace problems. However, completing each case requires considerable thumbing back and forth through this section. The correct response leads to a brief discussion and then to further details of the clinical course. The "story line" is not always coherent and, in some cases, the questions could be more clearly posed.

The major advantage to this approach is rapid "feedback" with the reason presented for the response being considered "right" or "wrong." The level of questioning is uneven and the discussion component is necessarily brief. A nursing or respiratory therapy student might find this helpful for superficial review at the end of the appropriate course or clinical rotation. Neither the approach nor the content would be of value to medical students or resident staff.

The material in section 2 would be more effectively organized as individual self-contained units, each leading to a summary or conclusion before proceeding with the next problem. The sequence should be arranged to provide increasing levels of difficulty. The new desk model computerized teaching programs offer significant advantages in this area and will likely supersede texts of this type.

In summary, this is a programmed, brief, superficial review of respiratory problems of the neonate. It may be helpful as a quick refresher for students of nursing and respiratory therapy.…

Robert W. Hirnle

CLINICAL SIMULATIONS IN NEONATAL RESPIRATORY THERAPY

New York, John Wiley & Sons Inc., 1982, 316 pp.

This is a problem oriented programmed text for health professionals, respiratory therapists and nurses. The first part is a self-instructional approach to fetal-neonatal cardiopulmonary development and the second consists of six problem sets simulating clinical conditions in neonates.

The material covered in part 1 is elementary and deals with embryology and physiology. It does not correlate with the clinical scenarios presented in part 2, The latter are realistic commonplace problems. However, completing each case requires considerable thumbing back and forth through this section. The correct response leads to a brief discussion and then to further details of the clinical course. The "story line" is not always coherent and, in some cases, the questions could be more clearly posed.

The major advantage to this approach is rapid "feedback" with the reason presented for the response being considered "right" or "wrong." The level of questioning is uneven and the discussion component is necessarily brief. A nursing or respiratory therapy student might find this helpful for superficial review at the end of the appropriate course or clinical rotation. Neither the approach nor the content would be of value to medical students or resident staff.

The material in section 2 would be more effectively organized as individual self-contained units, each leading to a summary or conclusion before proceeding with the next problem. The sequence should be arranged to provide increasing levels of difficulty. The new desk model computerized teaching programs offer significant advantages in this area and will likely supersede texts of this type.

In summary, this is a programmed, brief, superficial review of respiratory problems of the neonate. It may be helpful as a quick refresher for students of nursing and respiratory therapy.

10.3928/0090-4481-19830301-09

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