Pediatric Annals

BOOK REVIEWS 

MANAGING OB/GYN EMERGENCIES

John Huffman, MD

Abstract

John T. Queenan, M. D. (Editor)

MANAGING OB/GYN EMERGENCIES

Oradell, NJ: Medical Economics Books, 1981, 168 pp., $15.95 (softcover).

This is a small, softcover book containing 17 chapters that have been written by 32 authors. The chapter titles range from such subjects as "How to manage acute renal failure," "How good is emergency training for ob/gyn residents?" to "Surgery for ruptured pelvic abscesses?" and "Managing anovulatory bleeding medically."

The pediatrician will find two chapters, "Fetal bradycardia: Watch or deliver?" and "Fast action for the distressed newborn" of particular interest. Edward Quilligan in discussing fetal bradycardia suggests that the baby should be delivered as soon as possible if the pH of a sample of the scalp blood is less than 7. 20 or if the trend is toward increasing acidosis. In his opinion if scalp blood is not available it is better to deliver the infant when the FHR pattern shows severe variability or late deceleration.

In his comments on care of the distressed newborn, Dr. John Scanlon emphasizes that all delivery rooms should be equipped to care for newborns with acute perinatal asphyxia, shock, meconium aspiration, and hydrops fetal is.

All of the chapters are unusually well written and deal efficiently and directly with the pertinent problem. The authors know what to say and how to say it.…

John T. Queenan, M. D. (Editor)

MANAGING OB/GYN EMERGENCIES

Oradell, NJ: Medical Economics Books, 1981, 168 pp., $15.95 (softcover).

This is a small, softcover book containing 17 chapters that have been written by 32 authors. The chapter titles range from such subjects as "How to manage acute renal failure," "How good is emergency training for ob/gyn residents?" to "Surgery for ruptured pelvic abscesses?" and "Managing anovulatory bleeding medically."

The pediatrician will find two chapters, "Fetal bradycardia: Watch or deliver?" and "Fast action for the distressed newborn" of particular interest. Edward Quilligan in discussing fetal bradycardia suggests that the baby should be delivered as soon as possible if the pH of a sample of the scalp blood is less than 7. 20 or if the trend is toward increasing acidosis. In his opinion if scalp blood is not available it is better to deliver the infant when the FHR pattern shows severe variability or late deceleration.

In his comments on care of the distressed newborn, Dr. John Scanlon emphasizes that all delivery rooms should be equipped to care for newborns with acute perinatal asphyxia, shock, meconium aspiration, and hydrops fetal is.

All of the chapters are unusually well written and deal efficiently and directly with the pertinent problem. The authors know what to say and how to say it.

10.3928/0090-4481-19830301-08

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