Pediatric Annals

CME PRE-TEST

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians may receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award by reading the articles in this issue of PEDIATRIC ANNALS and successfully answering the quiz at the end of the issue. Thousands of pediatricians have taken part in this program so far, jointly administered by PEDIATRC ANNALS and Lenox Hill Hospital of New York. Complete instructions are given on page 61.

The Pre-Test below will assist you in assessing your present knowledge of the subject before reading further A CME Quiz appears at the end of the issue. To receive Category 1 CME credits, take the Pre-Test, read carefully each of the articles that follow, and complete the CME Quiz at the end of this issue. The quiz must be returned to the CME center for scoring.

CERTIFYING INSTITUTION

As an organization accredited for continuing medical education, Lenox Hill Hospital of New York designates this continuing medical education activity as meeting the criteria for three credit hours in Category 1 for Educational Materials for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association, provided it has been completed accordino to instructions.

PRE-TEST

1. Among the Indications for pelvic sonography In infants, children, or adolescents are

A. Ambiguous genitalia.

B. Pelvic mass.

C. Precocious puberty.

D. All of the above.

2. The reason why ultrasound has not been used more frequently to diagnose respiratory problems in children Is that

A. The sonic beam endangers the heart.

B. Both air and bone transmit the ultrasound beam poorly.

C. Examinations cannot be tailored to specific clinical problems.

D. The chest is too small.

3. Computed chest tomography is sometimes Indicated in children provided that

A. The child can be given heavy sedation before CT.

B. Scans of longer than 5 seconds can be made.

C. There is suspicion of metastatic disease or some parenchymal density in the chest x-ray.

D. A fiberoptic endoscope is positioned before CT begins.

4. Ionizing radiation is an inevitable consequence of computed tomography. When CT scans of the abdomen are made,

A. More radiation to the gonads will occur than is the case with a barium enema.

B. Less radiation is required than is needed for an intravenous pyelogram.

C. The amount of radiation required is less than that needed for abdominal angiography.

D. All of the above answers are false.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVE

The educational objective for this continuing medical education course on computed tomography and ultrasound is to provide the pediatrician with information on the newer imaging modalities that are available today and how they may be indicated for specific pediatrie problems. Case histories and photographs indicate how each of the imaging tecrv niques can be helpful in defining specific patient problems. When reading is completed, the physician should know under what circumstances ultrasound should be used to diagnose abdominal masses, ambiguous genitalia, and menstrual irregularities in pediatrie patients, how computed tomography can be helpful in certain other abdominal diseases, when computed tomography is indicated in respiratory disorders, and when ultrasound is the modality to be preferred in diagnosing diseases or malformations of the chest in infants and children. This is a continuation of the course on deep-tissue diagnosis that began in our February, 1 980, issue, and additional bibliographic references and illustrations will be found in that issue.…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians may receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award by reading the articles in this issue of PEDIATRIC ANNALS and successfully answering the quiz at the end of the issue. Thousands of pediatricians have taken part in this program so far, jointly administered by PEDIATRC ANNALS and Lenox Hill Hospital of New York. Complete instructions are given on page 61.

The Pre-Test below will assist you in assessing your present knowledge of the subject before reading further A CME Quiz appears at the end of the issue. To receive Category 1 CME credits, take the Pre-Test, read carefully each of the articles that follow, and complete the CME Quiz at the end of this issue. The quiz must be returned to the CME center for scoring.

CERTIFYING INSTITUTION

As an organization accredited for continuing medical education, Lenox Hill Hospital of New York designates this continuing medical education activity as meeting the criteria for three credit hours in Category 1 for Educational Materials for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association, provided it has been completed accordino to instructions.

PRE-TEST

1. Among the Indications for pelvic sonography In infants, children, or adolescents are

A. Ambiguous genitalia.

B. Pelvic mass.

C. Precocious puberty.

D. All of the above.

2. The reason why ultrasound has not been used more frequently to diagnose respiratory problems in children Is that

A. The sonic beam endangers the heart.

B. Both air and bone transmit the ultrasound beam poorly.

C. Examinations cannot be tailored to specific clinical problems.

D. The chest is too small.

3. Computed chest tomography is sometimes Indicated in children provided that

A. The child can be given heavy sedation before CT.

B. Scans of longer than 5 seconds can be made.

C. There is suspicion of metastatic disease or some parenchymal density in the chest x-ray.

D. A fiberoptic endoscope is positioned before CT begins.

4. Ionizing radiation is an inevitable consequence of computed tomography. When CT scans of the abdomen are made,

A. More radiation to the gonads will occur than is the case with a barium enema.

B. Less radiation is required than is needed for an intravenous pyelogram.

C. The amount of radiation required is less than that needed for abdominal angiography.

D. All of the above answers are false.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVE

The educational objective for this continuing medical education course on computed tomography and ultrasound is to provide the pediatrician with information on the newer imaging modalities that are available today and how they may be indicated for specific pediatrie problems. Case histories and photographs indicate how each of the imaging tecrv niques can be helpful in defining specific patient problems. When reading is completed, the physician should know under what circumstances ultrasound should be used to diagnose abdominal masses, ambiguous genitalia, and menstrual irregularities in pediatrie patients, how computed tomography can be helpful in certain other abdominal diseases, when computed tomography is indicated in respiratory disorders, and when ultrasound is the modality to be preferred in diagnosing diseases or malformations of the chest in infants and children. This is a continuation of the course on deep-tissue diagnosis that began in our February, 1 980, issue, and additional bibliographic references and illustrations will be found in that issue.

10.3928/0090-4481-19800501-04

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