Pediatric Annals

CME QUIZ

Abstract

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the articles in this issue ol PEDIATRIC ANNALS and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages near the back of this issue.

To assist you in studying the material, the Pre-Test below will indicate some of the areas to be covered and allow you to challenge your present knowledge of these subjects before reading further.

PRE-TEST

1. All but one of the following are environmental causes that have been frequently associated with pediatric cataracts. Which is not such a cause?

A. Systemic steroids.

B. Maternal herpes zoster.

C. Maternal diabetes mellitus

D. Paradichiorobenzene.

2. In the treatment of corneal infection in an infant, one of the following therapies could result in permanent visual defect.

A. Debridement.

B. Topical antibiotic.

C. Boric acid.

D. Cortisol.

3. Poor compliance is a problem when one attempting to use drug therapy to ameliorate vision defects of small children. Ways to improve compliance include

A. Using short-acting drugs whenever possible.

B. Arranging for the child to be dismissed from classes so that four equal doses can be given at precise six-hour intervals.

C. Encouraging the child to keep a month's supply of acetazolamide (e.g., 100 tablets) with him in his desk at school.

D. Giving specific directions on administration and using drugs with prolonged action whenever possible.

4. Public Law 94-142, enacted on November 29, 1975, is important to the pediatrician working with visually impaired youngsters because it

A. Protects the physician from malpractice suits based on missed diagnoses.

B. Establishes capitation grants for pediatrie residencies in schools for the blind.

C. Provides tax-supported transportation and corrective and supportive services for visually handicapped children throught the U.S.

D. Provides for the establishment of chairs of pediatrie ophthalmology in Land Grant colleges.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVE

The educational objective of this continuing medical education offering is to give the pediatrician a better understanding of the world in which the blind or visually impaired child lives and a recognition that most "blind" children are in fact sighted to some extent and capable of being helped to achieve maximal use of their visual capacity. New treatments for eye infections and injuries are presented, contraindications of dangerous therapies noted, and suggestions made for consultation with specialists working with visually impaired children.…

HOW TO OBTAIN CME CREDITS BY READING THIS ISSUE

Pediatricians can receive Category 1 credits for the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association by reading the articles in this issue ol PEDIATRIC ANNALS and successfully completing the quiz at the end of the issue. Complete instructions are given on the quiz pages near the back of this issue.

To assist you in studying the material, the Pre-Test below will indicate some of the areas to be covered and allow you to challenge your present knowledge of these subjects before reading further.

PRE-TEST

1. All but one of the following are environmental causes that have been frequently associated with pediatric cataracts. Which is not such a cause?

A. Systemic steroids.

B. Maternal herpes zoster.

C. Maternal diabetes mellitus

D. Paradichiorobenzene.

2. In the treatment of corneal infection in an infant, one of the following therapies could result in permanent visual defect.

A. Debridement.

B. Topical antibiotic.

C. Boric acid.

D. Cortisol.

3. Poor compliance is a problem when one attempting to use drug therapy to ameliorate vision defects of small children. Ways to improve compliance include

A. Using short-acting drugs whenever possible.

B. Arranging for the child to be dismissed from classes so that four equal doses can be given at precise six-hour intervals.

C. Encouraging the child to keep a month's supply of acetazolamide (e.g., 100 tablets) with him in his desk at school.

D. Giving specific directions on administration and using drugs with prolonged action whenever possible.

4. Public Law 94-142, enacted on November 29, 1975, is important to the pediatrician working with visually impaired youngsters because it

A. Protects the physician from malpractice suits based on missed diagnoses.

B. Establishes capitation grants for pediatrie residencies in schools for the blind.

C. Provides tax-supported transportation and corrective and supportive services for visually handicapped children throught the U.S.

D. Provides for the establishment of chairs of pediatrie ophthalmology in Land Grant colleges.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVE

The educational objective of this continuing medical education offering is to give the pediatrician a better understanding of the world in which the blind or visually impaired child lives and a recognition that most "blind" children are in fact sighted to some extent and capable of being helped to achieve maximal use of their visual capacity. New treatments for eye infections and injuries are presented, contraindications of dangerous therapies noted, and suggestions made for consultation with specialists working with visually impaired children.

10.3928/0090-4481-19801101-04

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