Pediatric Annals

CME PRE-TEST

Abstract

INSTRUCTIONS

To assist the pediatrician in studying this issue, a self-assessment Pre-Test is offered below, so that the reader may challenge himself on his knowledge of the subject before reading further in this issue. To qualify for continuing-medical-education credits, it will be necessary to read carefully each of the articles that follow, successfully complete the CME quiz at the end of the issue, and return the quiz to the CME center for scoring.

CERTIFYING INSTITUTION

As an organization accredited for continuing medical education, the Lenox Hill Hospital of New York designates this continuing-medical-education activity as meeting the criteria for three credit hours in Category 1 for Educational Materials for the Physician's Recognition Act of the American Medical Association, provided it has been completed according to instructions.

PRE-TEST

1. There is some evidence to indicate that respiratory allergies, especially asthma,

A. Are decreasing in severity.

B. Are decreasing in frequency.

C. Are increasing in severity.

D. Have remained relatively unchanged in severity or frequency for many years.

2. The greater the eosinophil count in a child with allergy,

A. The less likelihood treatment will be successful.

B. The more likelihood treatment will be successful.

C. The more likelihood the child will develop cancer.

D. The more likelihood a diagnosis of allergy is incorrect.

3. The symptoms of an allergic patient are due to

A. The reaction of an allergen with immunoglobulin G.

B. The reaction of an allergen and IgE on the surface of tissue mast cells.

C. An increase in leukocytes brought about by the invading antigen.

D. Synthesization of secretory IgA.

4. Atopic dermatitis in early childhood typically has remissions and exacerbations, with a tendency to

A. Develop into a chronic condition by age 5.

B. Spontaneously clear between the ages of 3 and 5.

C. Leave permanent scars in most children.

D. Develop into an aggravated eczema during adolescence.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVE

The educational objective of this issue of PEDIATRIC ANNALS is to update the pediatrician on recent advances in allergy and immunology. When completed, the reader should be able to take an appropriate patient and family history, order the proper laboratory tests, make necessary evaluations to determine the cause of the patient's allergic reaction, select appropriate patients for skin-testing, and know which patients he can treat successfully himself and which should be referred; An update on the pathophysiology involved in the reaction of allergen and antibody is included, so that the physician will understand the etiology of different allergic symptoms.…

INSTRUCTIONS

To assist the pediatrician in studying this issue, a self-assessment Pre-Test is offered below, so that the reader may challenge himself on his knowledge of the subject before reading further in this issue. To qualify for continuing-medical-education credits, it will be necessary to read carefully each of the articles that follow, successfully complete the CME quiz at the end of the issue, and return the quiz to the CME center for scoring.

CERTIFYING INSTITUTION

As an organization accredited for continuing medical education, the Lenox Hill Hospital of New York designates this continuing-medical-education activity as meeting the criteria for three credit hours in Category 1 for Educational Materials for the Physician's Recognition Act of the American Medical Association, provided it has been completed according to instructions.

PRE-TEST

1. There is some evidence to indicate that respiratory allergies, especially asthma,

A. Are decreasing in severity.

B. Are decreasing in frequency.

C. Are increasing in severity.

D. Have remained relatively unchanged in severity or frequency for many years.

2. The greater the eosinophil count in a child with allergy,

A. The less likelihood treatment will be successful.

B. The more likelihood treatment will be successful.

C. The more likelihood the child will develop cancer.

D. The more likelihood a diagnosis of allergy is incorrect.

3. The symptoms of an allergic patient are due to

A. The reaction of an allergen with immunoglobulin G.

B. The reaction of an allergen and IgE on the surface of tissue mast cells.

C. An increase in leukocytes brought about by the invading antigen.

D. Synthesization of secretory IgA.

4. Atopic dermatitis in early childhood typically has remissions and exacerbations, with a tendency to

A. Develop into a chronic condition by age 5.

B. Spontaneously clear between the ages of 3 and 5.

C. Leave permanent scars in most children.

D. Develop into an aggravated eczema during adolescence.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVE

The educational objective of this issue of PEDIATRIC ANNALS is to update the pediatrician on recent advances in allergy and immunology. When completed, the reader should be able to take an appropriate patient and family history, order the proper laboratory tests, make necessary evaluations to determine the cause of the patient's allergic reaction, select appropriate patients for skin-testing, and know which patients he can treat successfully himself and which should be referred; An update on the pathophysiology involved in the reaction of allergen and antibody is included, so that the physician will understand the etiology of different allergic symptoms.

10.3928/0090-4481-19790801-03

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