Pediatric Annals

A Pediatrician's View

Milton I Levine, MD

Abstract

CME ACCREDITATION

We are pleased to announce that with this issue Pediatric Annals becomes a source of continuing medical education programs that meet the criteria for Category I of the American Medical Association's Physicians' Recognition Award. We hope that many of our readers will grasp this opportunity to gain credits.

There will be no registration fee. The pediatrician wishing to obtain credits will pay only the cost of administering the program ($10 - less than $3.50 a point for each test). Three credit hours will be awarded pediatricians who successfully complete the answers to the test questions at the end of each issue of the magazine. The first such test begins on page 96.

PEDIATRIC ANNALS was the first magazine to be devoted solely to continuing pediatric education. When it first began publication, in 1973, it was immediately and widely accepted as being an excellent and up-to-date source of pediatric knowledge. Each issue since then has been devoted to one specific subject, and our contributors have been recognized authorities in their various fields.

With the support of a most active Editorial Advisory Board (it includes five former presidents of the American Academy of Pediatrics, six Professors of Pediatrics in medical colleges, and seven practicing pediatricians), every contribution to Pediatric Annals is carefully reviewed for accuracy and readability before publication. It is through the cooperation of this board that we have been able to maintain the high standards that have resulted in the magazine's being so widely accepted as a teaching asset - not only in the private practice of pediatrics but also in many medical schools and hospitals, where it is used in teaching students, interns, and residents. Its articles are accepted for inclusion in Index Medicus, and the magazine has been selected by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development for publication of a monthly review of subjects under study by that governmental agency.

PEDIATRIC ANNALS will offer in 1979 and the following years a carefully organized and wellthought-out program of pediatric education. As in the past, we plan to cover almost every subject with a single issue, although occasionally some subjects will require more extensive treatment. For the remainder of this year the subjects to be covered include neonatal medicine, epilepsy (two issues), pediatric hematology (two issues) cerebral palsy, sexual abuse of children, dyslexia, allergy, nutrition, and childhood gynecology.

Next year we plan to review pediatric cardiology, endocrinology, nephrology, roentgenology, drug abuse, adolescent pregnancy, the blind and deaf child, pollutants in the child's life, birth defects, and emotional problems of childhood and adolescence.

Other important subjects of value and interest to the pediatrician will be covered in subsequent years. We invite our readers to take advantage of the opportunity to earn CME credits while continuing to enjoy reading the articles in the magazine.

This issue of PEDIATRIC ANNALS completes the symposium on pediatric oncology organized by Dr. Carl Pochedly, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the State University of New York School of Medicine at Stony Brook and director of hematology/oncology at Nassau County Medical Center.

The first three articles deal with solid tumors in children - malignancies that are rarer among those in that age group than the leukemias and lymphomas discussed previously.* But these conditions - retinoblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and the histiocytosis syndromes - do occur with sufficient frequency that the practicing pediatrician will want to be ever on the alert for them.

As I have mentioned before, the ability to diagnose the rarer pediatric entities is one of the important characteristics differentiating between the welltrained and well-read pediatrician and the average pediatrician.

Each of these…

CME ACCREDITATION

We are pleased to announce that with this issue Pediatric Annals becomes a source of continuing medical education programs that meet the criteria for Category I of the American Medical Association's Physicians' Recognition Award. We hope that many of our readers will grasp this opportunity to gain credits.

There will be no registration fee. The pediatrician wishing to obtain credits will pay only the cost of administering the program ($10 - less than $3.50 a point for each test). Three credit hours will be awarded pediatricians who successfully complete the answers to the test questions at the end of each issue of the magazine. The first such test begins on page 96.

PEDIATRIC ANNALS was the first magazine to be devoted solely to continuing pediatric education. When it first began publication, in 1973, it was immediately and widely accepted as being an excellent and up-to-date source of pediatric knowledge. Each issue since then has been devoted to one specific subject, and our contributors have been recognized authorities in their various fields.

With the support of a most active Editorial Advisory Board (it includes five former presidents of the American Academy of Pediatrics, six Professors of Pediatrics in medical colleges, and seven practicing pediatricians), every contribution to Pediatric Annals is carefully reviewed for accuracy and readability before publication. It is through the cooperation of this board that we have been able to maintain the high standards that have resulted in the magazine's being so widely accepted as a teaching asset - not only in the private practice of pediatrics but also in many medical schools and hospitals, where it is used in teaching students, interns, and residents. Its articles are accepted for inclusion in Index Medicus, and the magazine has been selected by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development for publication of a monthly review of subjects under study by that governmental agency.

PEDIATRIC ANNALS will offer in 1979 and the following years a carefully organized and wellthought-out program of pediatric education. As in the past, we plan to cover almost every subject with a single issue, although occasionally some subjects will require more extensive treatment. For the remainder of this year the subjects to be covered include neonatal medicine, epilepsy (two issues), pediatric hematology (two issues) cerebral palsy, sexual abuse of children, dyslexia, allergy, nutrition, and childhood gynecology.

Next year we plan to review pediatric cardiology, endocrinology, nephrology, roentgenology, drug abuse, adolescent pregnancy, the blind and deaf child, pollutants in the child's life, birth defects, and emotional problems of childhood and adolescence.

Other important subjects of value and interest to the pediatrician will be covered in subsequent years. We invite our readers to take advantage of the opportunity to earn CME credits while continuing to enjoy reading the articles in the magazine.

This issue of PEDIATRIC ANNALS completes the symposium on pediatric oncology organized by Dr. Carl Pochedly, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the State University of New York School of Medicine at Stony Brook and director of hematology/oncology at Nassau County Medical Center.

The first three articles deal with solid tumors in children - malignancies that are rarer among those in that age group than the leukemias and lymphomas discussed previously.* But these conditions - retinoblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and the histiocytosis syndromes - do occur with sufficient frequency that the practicing pediatrician will want to be ever on the alert for them.

As I have mentioned before, the ability to diagnose the rarer pediatric entities is one of the important characteristics differentiating between the welltrained and well-read pediatrician and the average pediatrician.

Each of these first three authors presents an orderly and clear review of his subject, including a review of the clinical features and diagnosis and a discussion of the most modern treatment. The importance of early recognition is stressed.

The fourth article concerns the management of infections in children with cancer. It has been contributed by Dr. Arthur S. Levine, chief of pediatric oncology at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and Dr. Philip A. Pizzo, senior investigator of its Section on Infectious Diseases. This is a most significant article, for although the attack on cancer has met with considerable success, many of the newer treatments have compromised the defenses of the affected children. As a result, various fungi and certain nonpathogenic bacteria have become life-threatening agents that have considerably increased the mortality of children with cancer.

This article will be especially valuable to the practicing pediatrician who is caring for children with malignancies during periods when they are not hospitalized.

10.3928/0090-4481-19790101-03

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