Pediatric Annals

Interactions of Pediatricians and Families

David Belais Friedman, MD; Hershel K Swinger

Abstract

Dr. Williams has shown us how it can be quite revealing to interview both the teenager and the parents at the same time.

A number of years ago, the interactions of pediatricians and families were explored in a well-child clinic* The authors drew the following conclusions:

1. The interaction or relationship between mother (parent) and child and the kind and quality of physical care administered are important in the process of child development.

2. Awareness of the elements of this interaction gives the clinician a tool to work with in his counseling role and makes him more effective in this role.

3. It is meaningful to parents and helpful in the development of a healthy adult personality and self-image to bring feelings out in the open with the help of a friendly, accepting, professionally skilled person.

4. Awareness of his own interaction with and feelings toward parents and child enables the pediatrician to be more effective in his role as family adviser and counselor.

In the following article, Dr. Kessler discusses these and other issues in relation to the handicapped child. ?…

Dr. Williams has shown us how it can be quite revealing to interview both the teenager and the parents at the same time.

A number of years ago, the interactions of pediatricians and families were explored in a well-child clinic* The authors drew the following conclusions:

1. The interaction or relationship between mother (parent) and child and the kind and quality of physical care administered are important in the process of child development.

2. Awareness of the elements of this interaction gives the clinician a tool to work with in his counseling role and makes him more effective in this role.

3. It is meaningful to parents and helpful in the development of a healthy adult personality and self-image to bring feelings out in the open with the help of a friendly, accepting, professionally skilled person.

4. Awareness of his own interaction with and feelings toward parents and child enables the pediatrician to be more effective in his role as family adviser and counselor.

In the following article, Dr. Kessler discusses these and other issues in relation to the handicapped child. ?

10.3928/0090-4481-19771001-09

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